The Children's Hour

Thus far, the criticism surrounding the president's shameless exploitation of schoolchildren at the recent White House 23-Executive-"Actions" performance has focused largely on how wrong it was to use little kids as political props. Even more reprehensible though is staged propaganda falsely promoted as unsolicited 'Letters to the President' written from the hearts of vulnerable children.

Therefore, based on the content, style, and an odd mix of childlike misspellings and decidedly unchildlike opinions featured in the letters, it's highly probable that four children were used as political pawns recruited to assist President Obama in "fundamentally transforming the United States of America."

Here's an interesting coincidence: little Julia Stokes hailed from the Democrats' home base, Washington DC. Master Grant Fritz traveled from the blue state of Maryland; the vivacious Hinna Zeejah came to the nation's capitol from Oceanside, NY, where 55% of the residents historically vote Democrat; and Taejah Goode flew north from Douglasville, Georgia, located 20 miles west of Atlanta in the solidly Democratic 13th congressional district.

Then there's the issue of suggesting that eight-, 10- and 11-year-old children have policy opinions apart from the influence of their parents. Isn't it when teenagers individuate that they stop parroting what they hear at home and are less apt to want to be seen as agreeing with mom and dad?

Therefore, it's unlikely that the racially-diverse foursome on exhibit at the White House were so disturbed by the Sandy Hook events that, without adult coaching or a 45-cent stamp, all penned and mailed thoughtful handwritten letters to Barack Obama.

Moreover, the content of the letters suggests that either these kids seriously lack basic writing skills, or someone thought it would be more believable if the anti-gun messages were presented in a childlike writing style. Think "Toys Я Us."

Either way, the one thing that can be gleaned from the correspondence is that Barack Obama should pay less attention to attacking the Constitution and more time admitting that federally-funded public education is an abysmal failure.

One of the four writers is the daughter of pediatrician Theophil Stokes. Julia Stokes is in her first year of junior high school, yet her letter was sloppy and filled with crossed out and misspelled words. So either Julia inherited her physician-like handwriting from Dad or the carelessness was deliberate.

One standout in Julia's letter was the word "safty." Little Julia, bless her heart, also shared that "There are no word to explain how sad I am."

Are Americans supposed to believe that an 11-year-old girl -- who apparently doesn't know that there's an apostrophe in "I'm" or that Washington DC shouldn't be written as "dc" -- expresses herself so eloquently? For most preteen girls the only thing they "would not be able to bear the thought of losing" are Justin Bieber concert tickets.

Moreover, despite Julia's deficiency in 7th grade English and even though she did say, "I may not that into politics," she sure was well-versed on gun control. It was Julia's "opinon" that the "only thing [guns] do is harm or kill and ...should only be used in most horrible event where others will get hurt if they are not" used. Yes, sort of like Aurora, Newtown, and Tucson.

Although Julia's not interested in politics, she did remember from civics class that "laws have to be passed by congress." Whether Congress will be involved or not, Miss Stokes did beseech the Constitutional renegade living in the White House to save America by making "guns not allowed."

Then there was 10-year-old Taejah Goode. Taejah, who identified himself as a "You American," is a man of few words. Based on the limited content of his letter, Taejah seemed wholeheartedly convinced that Barack Obama possesses the superhuman power to singlehandedly "STOP" gun violence.

Next up was eight-year-old Grant Fritz. Grant, like every third grade boy, apparently spends most of his free time thinking about: changing "the law with guns." Grant knows that America is a "free country, but..." in light of the danger those freedoms sometimes pose, he recommended Obama establish "a limit with guns."

In addition to commenting on restricting the Second Amendment, Fritz begged the President: "Please don't let people own machine guns or other powerful guns like that." Then he signed off with a suspiciously correct use of "you're/your," saying "P.S.: I know you're doing your best."

The little girl in the red dress was Hinna Zeejah, a "3rd Grader in School #8" on Long Island. To drive home a point, Hinna exhibited even more affection for capital letters than Taejah Goode.

The high-fiving Hinna wrote that on the day of the Sandy Hook shootings, "after wacthing the News all day...one question poped" into her head: "Can we stop using Guns?"

Hinna said she'd be happier and feel safer in the country she loves "if they are no Guns on the street," so that "no one could get hurt" -- unless of course they're thrown off a subway platform, slashed with a razor blade, beaten with a hammer, or randomly stabbed at Bed, Bath and Beyond.

Hinna went on to declare that "BULLETS DON'T HAVE EYES." It was probably that thoughtful statement that, together with her "No Guns" artwork, made her letter stand out amongst the thousands Obama supposedly received.

It's clear that President Obama expects the nation to believe that a man who accepts counsel from absolutely no one is suddenly soliciting legislative advice from eight-, 10- and 11-year-olds. All things considered, it's very hard to accept as true that the White House event was not a calculated attempt on Obama's part to further convince the nation to acquiesce to his anti-gun agenda. Thinking otherwise would be like expecting us to buy Michelle Obama's 2011 shopping trip to Target as spur-of-the-moment.

The president expecting intelligent people to accept that, completely without adult influence, four children had the wherewithal to independently write, edit, stamp, and mail letters to him about the Second Amendment makes the whole event look like another patented Barack Obama dog-and-phony show.

Author's content: http://www.jeannie-ology.com/ 

Thus far, the criticism surrounding the president's shameless exploitation of schoolchildren at the recent White House 23-Executive-"Actions" performance has focused largely on how wrong it was to use little kids as political props. Even more reprehensible though is staged propaganda falsely promoted as unsolicited 'Letters to the President' written from the hearts of vulnerable children.

Therefore, based on the content, style, and an odd mix of childlike misspellings and decidedly unchildlike opinions featured in the letters, it's highly probable that four children were used as political pawns recruited to assist President Obama in "fundamentally transforming the United States of America."

Here's an interesting coincidence: little Julia Stokes hailed from the Democrats' home base, Washington DC. Master Grant Fritz traveled from the blue state of Maryland; the vivacious Hinna Zeejah came to the nation's capitol from Oceanside, NY, where 55% of the residents historically vote Democrat; and Taejah Goode flew north from Douglasville, Georgia, located 20 miles west of Atlanta in the solidly Democratic 13th congressional district.

Then there's the issue of suggesting that eight-, 10- and 11-year-old children have policy opinions apart from the influence of their parents. Isn't it when teenagers individuate that they stop parroting what they hear at home and are less apt to want to be seen as agreeing with mom and dad?

Therefore, it's unlikely that the racially-diverse foursome on exhibit at the White House were so disturbed by the Sandy Hook events that, without adult coaching or a 45-cent stamp, all penned and mailed thoughtful handwritten letters to Barack Obama.

Moreover, the content of the letters suggests that either these kids seriously lack basic writing skills, or someone thought it would be more believable if the anti-gun messages were presented in a childlike writing style. Think "Toys Я Us."

Either way, the one thing that can be gleaned from the correspondence is that Barack Obama should pay less attention to attacking the Constitution and more time admitting that federally-funded public education is an abysmal failure.

One of the four writers is the daughter of pediatrician Theophil Stokes. Julia Stokes is in her first year of junior high school, yet her letter was sloppy and filled with crossed out and misspelled words. So either Julia inherited her physician-like handwriting from Dad or the carelessness was deliberate.

One standout in Julia's letter was the word "safty." Little Julia, bless her heart, also shared that "There are no word to explain how sad I am."

Are Americans supposed to believe that an 11-year-old girl -- who apparently doesn't know that there's an apostrophe in "I'm" or that Washington DC shouldn't be written as "dc" -- expresses herself so eloquently? For most preteen girls the only thing they "would not be able to bear the thought of losing" are Justin Bieber concert tickets.

Moreover, despite Julia's deficiency in 7th grade English and even though she did say, "I may not that into politics," she sure was well-versed on gun control. It was Julia's "opinon" that the "only thing [guns] do is harm or kill and ...should only be used in most horrible event where others will get hurt if they are not" used. Yes, sort of like Aurora, Newtown, and Tucson.

Although Julia's not interested in politics, she did remember from civics class that "laws have to be passed by congress." Whether Congress will be involved or not, Miss Stokes did beseech the Constitutional renegade living in the White House to save America by making "guns not allowed."

Then there was 10-year-old Taejah Goode. Taejah, who identified himself as a "You American," is a man of few words. Based on the limited content of his letter, Taejah seemed wholeheartedly convinced that Barack Obama possesses the superhuman power to singlehandedly "STOP" gun violence.

Next up was eight-year-old Grant Fritz. Grant, like every third grade boy, apparently spends most of his free time thinking about: changing "the law with guns." Grant knows that America is a "free country, but..." in light of the danger those freedoms sometimes pose, he recommended Obama establish "a limit with guns."

In addition to commenting on restricting the Second Amendment, Fritz begged the President: "Please don't let people own machine guns or other powerful guns like that." Then he signed off with a suspiciously correct use of "you're/your," saying "P.S.: I know you're doing your best."

The little girl in the red dress was Hinna Zeejah, a "3rd Grader in School #8" on Long Island. To drive home a point, Hinna exhibited even more affection for capital letters than Taejah Goode.

The high-fiving Hinna wrote that on the day of the Sandy Hook shootings, "after wacthing the News all day...one question poped" into her head: "Can we stop using Guns?"

Hinna said she'd be happier and feel safer in the country she loves "if they are no Guns on the street," so that "no one could get hurt" -- unless of course they're thrown off a subway platform, slashed with a razor blade, beaten with a hammer, or randomly stabbed at Bed, Bath and Beyond.

Hinna went on to declare that "BULLETS DON'T HAVE EYES." It was probably that thoughtful statement that, together with her "No Guns" artwork, made her letter stand out amongst the thousands Obama supposedly received.

It's clear that President Obama expects the nation to believe that a man who accepts counsel from absolutely no one is suddenly soliciting legislative advice from eight-, 10- and 11-year-olds. All things considered, it's very hard to accept as true that the White House event was not a calculated attempt on Obama's part to further convince the nation to acquiesce to his anti-gun agenda. Thinking otherwise would be like expecting us to buy Michelle Obama's 2011 shopping trip to Target as spur-of-the-moment.

The president expecting intelligent people to accept that, completely without adult influence, four children had the wherewithal to independently write, edit, stamp, and mail letters to him about the Second Amendment makes the whole event look like another patented Barack Obama dog-and-phony show.

Author's content: http://www.jeannie-ology.com/