Celebrity Fetal Bumps

Mary Rose's clothes were hung in her closet and folded in her drawers.  The baby items we had packed away after the birth of our son years earlier were out and ready for use.  I had a scheduled c-section and looked forward to enjoying one last weekend with my son and husband before the birth of our daughter.

She died five days before my scheduled c-section.

Devastated by the news, we realized we had to quickly plan a funeral for our loved and anxiously awaited...fetus.  My daughter, Mary Rose, who was dressed in a white and pink newborn outfit with a pink hat, wrapped in a pink knitted blanket, and held by several members of my family, was not a person at all, according to the State of Michigan* -- she was a "fetal death."  The daughter whom we had a funeral for, whom we buried and received a bill from the funeral home for -- our precious fetus.

Even though we knew she was a person, the lurking feeling of irritation that surrounded the words "fetal death" stuck with me.  Does the world view my unborn child as a person or a fetus?

I have always been taught that words have power.  The pro-abortion lobby clearly understands this.  They have used the terms "fetus" and "embryo" as epithets when referring to babies in an effort to dehumanize and desensitize people's views of abortion.  Those who support abortions in the mainstream media and Hollywood say "termination of a fetus" or embryo.  Never do we hear them refer to an abortion as the "termination of a baby" or a human life.

So why is it that celebrities such as Natalie Portman and Jessica Alba promote the abortion lobby, even writing their slogans of "Right to Choose" and "Women's Rights" on their hands, and yet call their unborn babies just that -- a baby?  Portman and Alba, along with other pro-abortion celebrities who have been pregnant, never refer to their unborn as "a fetus bump," never refer to having a "fetus shower" or saying "we do not know the sex of our fetus."  When discussing their pregnancies, they say "baby bump," "baby shower," and "sex of our baby."  If celebrities and mainstream media believe that these women have "baby bumps" and "baby showers," then according to their own words, they do not believe they support a woman's right to "abort a fetus."  They are really saying they support a woman's right to take the life of her unborn child.

Yet another irony lies in the fact that Natalie Portman and many other celebrities are environmentalists.  Ms. Portman has been a vegan since childhood and is a supporter of an animal's right to live.  She campaigns for the rights of animals and refuses to wear fur or any other animal products.  She and many other celebrities care more for the right to life of animals than they do for the right to life of an innocent child.  In an article for the Huffington Post, Ms. Portman states:

But Foer makes his most impactful gesture as a peacemaker, when he unites the two sides of the animal eating debate in their reasoning. Both sides argue: We are not them. Those who refrain from eating animals argue: We don't have to go through what they go through -- we are not them. We are capable of making distinctions between what to eat and what not to eat (Americans eat cow but not dog, Hindus eat chicken but not cow, etc.). We are capable of considering others' minds and others' pain. We are not them. Whereas those who justify eating animals say the same thing: We are not them. They do not merit the same value of being as us. They are not us.

Yet in an address to "Women for Obama" in Las Vegas when referring to the "other's pain" and "other's mind" of the unborn, Portman states, "But we also know that losing our right to choose means that we put our sisters in jeopardy. It doesn't end abortion; it just ends freedom to abortion and safe abortion."

Perhaps Ms. Portman is not aware of the U.S. Constitution and what it explicitly proscribes.  The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, states, "No person shall be ... deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law[.]"  I believe that the Constitution was referring to people in this amendment, not animals.  But one cannot help but wonder -- would the same celebrities who believe that it is okay to take the life of a child while still in the womb be okay with taking the life of a gorilla while still in the mother's womb?  After all, it is not yet born.

Is an unborn life a person or an embryo?  If we use the celebrities' own words, they believe they are "having a baby shower," not a "fetus shower."  They believe that a seed is already a tree and that animals have rights to life.  So according to mainstream media and Hollywood celebrities, we can safely conclude that yes, an unborn life is a person.

 


* The law in Michigan has since been changed to issue a certificate of stillbirth to parents whose baby was born at 20 weeks' gestation or after.  Twenty-seven states currently have similar laws.

 

Mary Rose's clothes were hung in her closet and folded in her drawers.  The baby items we had packed away after the birth of our son years earlier were out and ready for use.  I had a scheduled c-section and looked forward to enjoying one last weekend with my son and husband before the birth of our daughter.

She died five days before my scheduled c-section.

Devastated by the news, we realized we had to quickly plan a funeral for our loved and anxiously awaited...fetus.  My daughter, Mary Rose, who was dressed in a white and pink newborn outfit with a pink hat, wrapped in a pink knitted blanket, and held by several members of my family, was not a person at all, according to the State of Michigan* -- she was a "fetal death."  The daughter whom we had a funeral for, whom we buried and received a bill from the funeral home for -- our precious fetus.

Even though we knew she was a person, the lurking feeling of irritation that surrounded the words "fetal death" stuck with me.  Does the world view my unborn child as a person or a fetus?

I have always been taught that words have power.  The pro-abortion lobby clearly understands this.  They have used the terms "fetus" and "embryo" as epithets when referring to babies in an effort to dehumanize and desensitize people's views of abortion.  Those who support abortions in the mainstream media and Hollywood say "termination of a fetus" or embryo.  Never do we hear them refer to an abortion as the "termination of a baby" or a human life.

So why is it that celebrities such as Natalie Portman and Jessica Alba promote the abortion lobby, even writing their slogans of "Right to Choose" and "Women's Rights" on their hands, and yet call their unborn babies just that -- a baby?  Portman and Alba, along with other pro-abortion celebrities who have been pregnant, never refer to their unborn as "a fetus bump," never refer to having a "fetus shower" or saying "we do not know the sex of our fetus."  When discussing their pregnancies, they say "baby bump," "baby shower," and "sex of our baby."  If celebrities and mainstream media believe that these women have "baby bumps" and "baby showers," then according to their own words, they do not believe they support a woman's right to "abort a fetus."  They are really saying they support a woman's right to take the life of her unborn child.

Yet another irony lies in the fact that Natalie Portman and many other celebrities are environmentalists.  Ms. Portman has been a vegan since childhood and is a supporter of an animal's right to live.  She campaigns for the rights of animals and refuses to wear fur or any other animal products.  She and many other celebrities care more for the right to life of animals than they do for the right to life of an innocent child.  In an article for the Huffington Post, Ms. Portman states:

But Foer makes his most impactful gesture as a peacemaker, when he unites the two sides of the animal eating debate in their reasoning. Both sides argue: We are not them. Those who refrain from eating animals argue: We don't have to go through what they go through -- we are not them. We are capable of making distinctions between what to eat and what not to eat (Americans eat cow but not dog, Hindus eat chicken but not cow, etc.). We are capable of considering others' minds and others' pain. We are not them. Whereas those who justify eating animals say the same thing: We are not them. They do not merit the same value of being as us. They are not us.

Yet in an address to "Women for Obama" in Las Vegas when referring to the "other's pain" and "other's mind" of the unborn, Portman states, "But we also know that losing our right to choose means that we put our sisters in jeopardy. It doesn't end abortion; it just ends freedom to abortion and safe abortion."

Perhaps Ms. Portman is not aware of the U.S. Constitution and what it explicitly proscribes.  The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, states, "No person shall be ... deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law[.]"  I believe that the Constitution was referring to people in this amendment, not animals.  But one cannot help but wonder -- would the same celebrities who believe that it is okay to take the life of a child while still in the womb be okay with taking the life of a gorilla while still in the mother's womb?  After all, it is not yet born.

Is an unborn life a person or an embryo?  If we use the celebrities' own words, they believe they are "having a baby shower," not a "fetus shower."  They believe that a seed is already a tree and that animals have rights to life.  So according to mainstream media and Hollywood celebrities, we can safely conclude that yes, an unborn life is a person.

 


* The law in Michigan has since been changed to issue a certificate of stillbirth to parents whose baby was born at 20 weeks' gestation or after.  Twenty-seven states currently have similar laws.