Never Call Socialism by Its Right Name

(See also: Socialism, by Any Other Name, Is Still Socialism)

Allen West was the latest to get his knuckles rapped for saying there were "about 78 to 81" members of the Democratic Party who are members of the Communist Party.I His crime, like McCarthy's, was in raising an uncomfortable subject. We may never know who is or isn't a communist, socialist, Marxist, Stalinist or Leninist in Congress, since all socialists work by deception, define words with obscurities, and refuse to identify themselves, with exceptions like Dohrn and Van Jones. Even in the heyday of communism, the most influential of its comrades were never "card carrying members" and lying was a way of life, which included obligatory perjury. But regardless of their nuances, deception is an integral part of their political ideology.

We have the guidance of an expert -- George Bernard Shaw of the Fabian Society who called Lenin, the "greatest Fabian of them all." He formulated and described the Fabian methodology: it used "methods of stealth, intrigue, subversion, and the deception of never calling socialism by its right name."II What we have unearthed from West's exchange, Moyers' ghost story, historical incidents, the Venona documents, and the House Committee on Un-American Hearings is something more important than who is or who isn't, and more important than differing definitions -- it is rule number one of the broad left: deception. Case in point: Shaw would not say that Lenin was the greatest Marxist or communist of them all -- but the greatest Fabian of them all. Not so shrill on the ears. And all they cared about was perception.III

Deception is starkly illustrated by the Fabian Society's famed stained glass window  revealed by Tony Blair in 2006 at the London School of Economics. Designed by Shaw, it shows Fabians "Sidney Webb and ER Pease... helping to build 'the new world'." The most stunning thing to note is the Fabian Society's coat of arms seen below: a wolf in sheep's clothing.

Davidson, an American, and his friend E.R. met in London in 1883 to discuss politics and others later joined them. Within a year British intellectuals such as George Bernard Shaw and Sidney Webb also joined. They named it the Fabian Society after Quintus Fabius Maximus, the Roman general whose strategies of wearing down opponents by delays led to the Roman victory over Hannibal. (c.f., National Health Insurance -- from Truman to Obama)

Shaw distinguished "the highly respectable Fabian Society" from other radical groups (like today's ACORN, OWS and communists). "The Fabian Society got rid of its Anarchists and Borrovians, and presented Socialism in the form of a series of parliamentary measures, thus making it possible for an ordinary respectable religious citizen to profess socialism and belong to a Socialist Society without any suspicion of lawlessness, exactly as he might profess himself a Conservative...."

Yet the Fabians' creed remained radical: Its goal was the "reorganization of society" with the extinction of private property and industrial capital from individual and class ownership, redistributing them to the "community for the general benefit." But the Fabians carefully hid their socialist philosophy saying "it was not desirable to make any change in the name by adding the word 'Socialist' to 'Fabian.'"IV Beneath their respectable sheepskin, however, the Fabians were host to Lenin and his Bolshevik followers holding a revolutionary conference in London before the revolution in Russia, and Bolsheviks were considered "comrades." Shaw, a highly respectable Fabian, called himself a "communist."

Let's shear off some of the wool and take a closer look at some of the radical Fabian policies. Shaw said that Socialism meant the "equality of income or nothing." You would be fed, clothed, lodged, taught and employed -- "whether you liked it or not." If the state discovered that you were not worth this trouble, "you might possibly be executed in a kindly manner." To understand the depth of Shaw's commitment to socialism, watch a clip of him in the movie The Soviet Story, a film by Edvins Snore. Visiting Russia in 1931, Shaw said that he was able to step into his grave comforted "with the knowledge that the civilization of the world will be saved and ...the new communist system is capable of leading mankind out of its present crisis...."  Were the Fabians radical? Stuart Chase, an American Fabian, said that socialism could be enforced by firing squads if necessary. Chase wrote A New Deal, which Roosevelt used as a slogan.IV Though the Fabians believed in the same radical goals as the Socialists and Communists, there was a difference in methods. Make no mistake they wanted world revolution also, but, unlike their comrades who believed in attaining power quickly by violence, they worked through patient changes in law, government, morality, economics, culture and education. They worked to spread Socialism through newspapers, Parliament, school boards and by backing candidates of either party in elections -- penetration and infiltration. For example with newspapers, Shaw said their "policy has been to try to induce some of these regular papers to give a column or two to Socialism, calling it by whatever name they please." Their chief tool, however, was through the indoctrination of young scholars -- intellectuals referred to as "parlor Bolsheviki."

The Webbs and George Bernard Shaw founded the London School of Economics in 1895. Faculty and students have included Bertrand Russell, John F Kennedy, Pierre Trudeau, George Soros, Peter Orszag, Robert Rubin, Harold Laski (a later head of the British Fabian Society), George Papandreou, David Rockefeller and John Maynard Keynes. The Webbs visited the U.S. in 1888, and in 1889 Webbs' Socialism in England was circulated at Harvard and other schools in the U.S.  In 1905 they incorporated the Intercollegiate Socialist Society and by 1908 there were Fabian chapters at Harvard, Princeton, NYU, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania. But Harvard was considered the "transmission belt" for socialism -- and specifically its Department of Economics. The most influential theory within the Department of Economics was that of Keynes. Keynes' socialism advocates strict control of the means of production through the supply of credit and money rather than ownership advocated by Marx.  This way the Fabian goal could change everything while maintaining the outward appearance of the sheepskin.

From these Ivy League campuses the seeds of socialism were planted in Washington during the early 1900's at the multiplying bureaucracies staffed by Fabian-indoctrinated theorists and professors. Norman Thomas, a Socialist, explained the utility of Keynes: "Keynes has had a great influence ....  He represents a decisive break with laissez-faire capitalism." John Strachey, a communist who entered the British Fabian Society in 1943, explained that Keynes' influence resulted in capitalism being "regulated and controlled by a central authority....The principal instruments of its policy should be variations in interest, budgetary deficits, and surpluses, public works, and a redistribution of personal incomes in equalitarian direction."V

The key Fabians who introduced Keynes' theories on the U.S. were Felix Frankfurter and Walter Lippman, one of the founders of The New Republic. During World War I They both became friendly with Franklin D Roosevelt. Later in Roosevelt's new deal they both secured positions and Frankfurter was appointed to the Supreme Court. Over 300 of Frankfurter's students worked in strategic government posts. One of these was Alger Hiss, a student of Frankfurter's at Harvard Law School who later clerked for him at the Supreme Court.  He also worked at the State Department and played a key role in the New Deal, at Yalta and in the formation of the United Nations. Contrary to the left's continued denials, the evidence against Hiss is overwhelming, as described by Shelton in Alger Hiss: Why He Chose Treason, --he was a communist and an asset to Soviet military intelligence. Thus we have the perfect elite wolf dressed like a lamb.

 


IAccusations that Obama is a socialist have met with immediate denials and have called them "dumb," or "name-calling" and "witch-hunting" while MSNBC falls back on "racist." The left uniformly call in a socialist to deny it such as Billy Wharton, co-chair of the Socialist Party USA.

 

II Stormer, John, None Dare Call It Treason, (New York: Buccaneer Books, 1964), 26, emphasis added.

IIIThis tactic of deception was copied by socialists in the U.S. In a classic, Roger Baldwin of the ACLU told an agitator: "Do steer away from making it look like a Socialist enterprise...We want to look patriots in everything we do. We want to get a good lot of flags, talk a good deal about the Constitution and what our forefathers wanted to make of this country, and to show that we are really the folks that really stand for the spirit of our institutions."

IVStormer, ibid. The influence of British Socialists didn't end with the New Deal but was evident during the Johnson administration: The Great Society" was a book written by Graham Wallas, an English socialist in 1914. The term was also used by the English socialist Harold Laski in his 1931 book Introduction to Politics.

VIbid., 183-4.

(See also: Socialism, by Any Other Name, Is Still Socialism)

Allen West was the latest to get his knuckles rapped for saying there were "about 78 to 81" members of the Democratic Party who are members of the Communist Party.I His crime, like McCarthy's, was in raising an uncomfortable subject. We may never know who is or isn't a communist, socialist, Marxist, Stalinist or Leninist in Congress, since all socialists work by deception, define words with obscurities, and refuse to identify themselves, with exceptions like Dohrn and Van Jones. Even in the heyday of communism, the most influential of its comrades were never "card carrying members" and lying was a way of life, which included obligatory perjury. But regardless of their nuances, deception is an integral part of their political ideology.

We have the guidance of an expert -- George Bernard Shaw of the Fabian Society who called Lenin, the "greatest Fabian of them all." He formulated and described the Fabian methodology: it used "methods of stealth, intrigue, subversion, and the deception of never calling socialism by its right name."II What we have unearthed from West's exchange, Moyers' ghost story, historical incidents, the Venona documents, and the House Committee on Un-American Hearings is something more important than who is or who isn't, and more important than differing definitions -- it is rule number one of the broad left: deception. Case in point: Shaw would not say that Lenin was the greatest Marxist or communist of them all -- but the greatest Fabian of them all. Not so shrill on the ears. And all they cared about was perception.III

Deception is starkly illustrated by the Fabian Society's famed stained glass window  revealed by Tony Blair in 2006 at the London School of Economics. Designed by Shaw, it shows Fabians "Sidney Webb and ER Pease... helping to build 'the new world'." The most stunning thing to note is the Fabian Society's coat of arms seen below: a wolf in sheep's clothing.

Davidson, an American, and his friend E.R. met in London in 1883 to discuss politics and others later joined them. Within a year British intellectuals such as George Bernard Shaw and Sidney Webb also joined. They named it the Fabian Society after Quintus Fabius Maximus, the Roman general whose strategies of wearing down opponents by delays led to the Roman victory over Hannibal. (c.f., National Health Insurance -- from Truman to Obama)

Shaw distinguished "the highly respectable Fabian Society" from other radical groups (like today's ACORN, OWS and communists). "The Fabian Society got rid of its Anarchists and Borrovians, and presented Socialism in the form of a series of parliamentary measures, thus making it possible for an ordinary respectable religious citizen to profess socialism and belong to a Socialist Society without any suspicion of lawlessness, exactly as he might profess himself a Conservative...."

Yet the Fabians' creed remained radical: Its goal was the "reorganization of society" with the extinction of private property and industrial capital from individual and class ownership, redistributing them to the "community for the general benefit." But the Fabians carefully hid their socialist philosophy saying "it was not desirable to make any change in the name by adding the word 'Socialist' to 'Fabian.'"IV Beneath their respectable sheepskin, however, the Fabians were host to Lenin and his Bolshevik followers holding a revolutionary conference in London before the revolution in Russia, and Bolsheviks were considered "comrades." Shaw, a highly respectable Fabian, called himself a "communist."

Let's shear off some of the wool and take a closer look at some of the radical Fabian policies. Shaw said that Socialism meant the "equality of income or nothing." You would be fed, clothed, lodged, taught and employed -- "whether you liked it or not." If the state discovered that you were not worth this trouble, "you might possibly be executed in a kindly manner." To understand the depth of Shaw's commitment to socialism, watch a clip of him in the movie The Soviet Story, a film by Edvins Snore. Visiting Russia in 1931, Shaw said that he was able to step into his grave comforted "with the knowledge that the civilization of the world will be saved and ...the new communist system is capable of leading mankind out of its present crisis...."  Were the Fabians radical? Stuart Chase, an American Fabian, said that socialism could be enforced by firing squads if necessary. Chase wrote A New Deal, which Roosevelt used as a slogan.IV Though the Fabians believed in the same radical goals as the Socialists and Communists, there was a difference in methods. Make no mistake they wanted world revolution also, but, unlike their comrades who believed in attaining power quickly by violence, they worked through patient changes in law, government, morality, economics, culture and education. They worked to spread Socialism through newspapers, Parliament, school boards and by backing candidates of either party in elections -- penetration and infiltration. For example with newspapers, Shaw said their "policy has been to try to induce some of these regular papers to give a column or two to Socialism, calling it by whatever name they please." Their chief tool, however, was through the indoctrination of young scholars -- intellectuals referred to as "parlor Bolsheviki."

The Webbs and George Bernard Shaw founded the London School of Economics in 1895. Faculty and students have included Bertrand Russell, John F Kennedy, Pierre Trudeau, George Soros, Peter Orszag, Robert Rubin, Harold Laski (a later head of the British Fabian Society), George Papandreou, David Rockefeller and John Maynard Keynes. The Webbs visited the U.S. in 1888, and in 1889 Webbs' Socialism in England was circulated at Harvard and other schools in the U.S.  In 1905 they incorporated the Intercollegiate Socialist Society and by 1908 there were Fabian chapters at Harvard, Princeton, NYU, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania. But Harvard was considered the "transmission belt" for socialism -- and specifically its Department of Economics. The most influential theory within the Department of Economics was that of Keynes. Keynes' socialism advocates strict control of the means of production through the supply of credit and money rather than ownership advocated by Marx.  This way the Fabian goal could change everything while maintaining the outward appearance of the sheepskin.

From these Ivy League campuses the seeds of socialism were planted in Washington during the early 1900's at the multiplying bureaucracies staffed by Fabian-indoctrinated theorists and professors. Norman Thomas, a Socialist, explained the utility of Keynes: "Keynes has had a great influence ....  He represents a decisive break with laissez-faire capitalism." John Strachey, a communist who entered the British Fabian Society in 1943, explained that Keynes' influence resulted in capitalism being "regulated and controlled by a central authority....The principal instruments of its policy should be variations in interest, budgetary deficits, and surpluses, public works, and a redistribution of personal incomes in equalitarian direction."V

The key Fabians who introduced Keynes' theories on the U.S. were Felix Frankfurter and Walter Lippman, one of the founders of The New Republic. During World War I They both became friendly with Franklin D Roosevelt. Later in Roosevelt's new deal they both secured positions and Frankfurter was appointed to the Supreme Court. Over 300 of Frankfurter's students worked in strategic government posts. One of these was Alger Hiss, a student of Frankfurter's at Harvard Law School who later clerked for him at the Supreme Court.  He also worked at the State Department and played a key role in the New Deal, at Yalta and in the formation of the United Nations. Contrary to the left's continued denials, the evidence against Hiss is overwhelming, as described by Shelton in Alger Hiss: Why He Chose Treason, --he was a communist and an asset to Soviet military intelligence. Thus we have the perfect elite wolf dressed like a lamb.

 


IAccusations that Obama is a socialist have met with immediate denials and have called them "dumb," or "name-calling" and "witch-hunting" while MSNBC falls back on "racist." The left uniformly call in a socialist to deny it such as Billy Wharton, co-chair of the Socialist Party USA.

 

II Stormer, John, None Dare Call It Treason, (New York: Buccaneer Books, 1964), 26, emphasis added.

IIIThis tactic of deception was copied by socialists in the U.S. In a classic, Roger Baldwin of the ACLU told an agitator: "Do steer away from making it look like a Socialist enterprise...We want to look patriots in everything we do. We want to get a good lot of flags, talk a good deal about the Constitution and what our forefathers wanted to make of this country, and to show that we are really the folks that really stand for the spirit of our institutions."

IVStormer, ibid. The influence of British Socialists didn't end with the New Deal but was evident during the Johnson administration: The Great Society" was a book written by Graham Wallas, an English socialist in 1914. The term was also used by the English socialist Harold Laski in his 1931 book Introduction to Politics.

VIbid., 183-4.

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