Al Sharpton and Sheila Jackson Lee Translate Racial Code

This whole "Differ with Barack Obama and You're a Racist" thing is getting old.  Take for example Texas Democrat congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee.  Sheila has already made it known that disagreeing with the first black president instantly makes you a racist.  Besides being at odds with Barack, more recently Jackson Lee has also declared racist any mention -- by a white candidate, that is -- of blue-collar work or, for that matter, any-color food stamps.

Thankfully, food stamps no longer come in a multicolored booklet that Sheila can scrutinize for racial undertones.  Even so, according to the congresswoman, Newt Gingrich daring to mention the words "food stamps" was inappropriate code whose intent was merely to "generate and signify race."

Now, Sheila Jackson Lee's official racially offended male counterpart, Reverend Al Sharpton, has decided that, if it seems rude and involves Obama and a Republican, it should immediately be exposed for what it is -- racial antagonism.

The latest Republican to be installed in the Racist Hall of Shame is Governor Jan Brewer of Arizona.  After meeting and greeting President Obama on the tarmac of Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport and despite being sued by his administration, Governor Brewer invited him to have lunch and join her for a tour of the border.

Barack Obama, hypersensitive narcissist that he is, decided to disregard Brewer's gracious welcome and instead chose to immediately address what he felt was the governor's negative depiction of him as "patronizing" in her book Scorpions for Breakfast.  Referring to the confrontation, Brewer said that she "felt a bit threatened, if you will, in the attitude that he had."

Exercising the type of feminist muscle liberals usually applaud, pint-sized Jan refused to be intimidated by Obama's confrontational demeanor and fought back.  Thus, the newest addition to the "That's Racist" laundry list: white governor refusing to be pushed around by black president.  And while pointing and wagging your finger in the face of anyone, let alone the president of the United States, is never a good idea, Sharpton's assertion that Brewer's spirited response to Obama's rebuke was racist is a bit over the top.

Based on the incident, Al Sharpton also flagged as racist such mildly critical terms as "thin-skinned" and feeling "a bit threatened."  Sirius XM radio host Joe Madison, who appeared on Reverend Sharpton's MSNBC show Politics Nation, contributed the following to the indictment: "unacceptable" and "disrespectful" finger-pointing, refusing to apologize, asking to see a president's college grades, and referring to President Obama by just his last name.

Speaking directly into the camera, Al Sharpton passionately addressed Jan Brewer directly, saying, "Thin-skinned?  You felt threatened?  What does that mean, you felt threatened?  By the president of the United States?  This is yet another example of disrespect and delegitimatizing this president."  Hilary O. Shelton, senior vice president for advocacy and policy at the NAACP, concurred and posed a question of his own to Brewer: "What were you afraid he would do, steal your purse?"

So, according to Al Sharpton, henceforth, if you're a petite Caucasian woman being reprimanded by a tall, imposing black president, and you're intimidated and overreact, you're a racist.

And that's not all. Al Sharpton also feels that Jan Brewer giving a handwritten letter to the president that said "I'd love an opportunity to share with you how we've been able to turn Arizona around with hard choices that turned out to be the right ones" was sort of like mentioning "food stamps" and could also be considered racist code.

Sharpton contends that Brewer's lunch/border invite was just a devious attempt to demean Barack Obama's intelligence by implying that he needed to be "lectured" and could "learn at her knee."  Thus, Al's logic seems to conclude that the Arizona governor secretly believes that, because the president is black, he's slow on the uptake and has a lot to learn.

The Right Reverend Al, who everyone knows is an expert at distinguishing truth from fiction, exposed Jan Brewer's disingenuous nature in the following way:

So, Governor Brewer, when were you telling the truth?  When you just walked out of the meeting and told the press in front of the White House, with a smile on your face, how it was cordial and how the tone was very good, positive -- or when you wrote a book saying it was condescending, and he was lecturing you?

Does anyone beside me remember a girl in large, green, plastic trash bag smeared with feces and a torso sporting upside-down racial slurs?

Respectfully pontificating about the Barack-Brewer brouhaha, Joe Madison also conveyed to Sharpton that the president was wise to walk away from a "fool."  Moreover, Madison also said he believes that people like Newt, Jan, and Joe "You Lie" Wilson are merely those "who cannot stand the fact that this is an African-American who is now one of the most powerful individuals on the planet.  And there are those who cannot consciously and subconsciously handle it."

Accusing a person of subconscious racism is almost as absurd as Sheila Jackson Lee sniffing out prejudice in cola-tinted Pepsi commercials and hurricanes that insist on being identified by names she thinks are too white.

Nevertheless, Governor Jan Brewer probably should have kept her composure during the encounter and perhaps described the incident in a way that did not include the word "threatened" -- a loaded word which could be easily misconstrued.  Yet one has to wonder if it would have even mattered to Sharpton and company -- because regardless of the circumstances, every time a conservative opens his/her mouth, derogatory racial code is all they seem to hear.

Thus, I'm sure Sheila Jackson Lee would agree with Reverend Al when he says, "They brought race in.  They put a race deck on the table.  If you pull a card, it's a race card because they set the deck."  No, it's Sharpton who put the race deck on the table, because in Al's world, it's all racist -- the cards, the deck, and the table. 

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

This whole "Differ with Barack Obama and You're a Racist" thing is getting old.  Take for example Texas Democrat congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee.  Sheila has already made it known that disagreeing with the first black president instantly makes you a racist.  Besides being at odds with Barack, more recently Jackson Lee has also declared racist any mention -- by a white candidate, that is -- of blue-collar work or, for that matter, any-color food stamps.

Thankfully, food stamps no longer come in a multicolored booklet that Sheila can scrutinize for racial undertones.  Even so, according to the congresswoman, Newt Gingrich daring to mention the words "food stamps" was inappropriate code whose intent was merely to "generate and signify race."

Now, Sheila Jackson Lee's official racially offended male counterpart, Reverend Al Sharpton, has decided that, if it seems rude and involves Obama and a Republican, it should immediately be exposed for what it is -- racial antagonism.

The latest Republican to be installed in the Racist Hall of Shame is Governor Jan Brewer of Arizona.  After meeting and greeting President Obama on the tarmac of Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport and despite being sued by his administration, Governor Brewer invited him to have lunch and join her for a tour of the border.

Barack Obama, hypersensitive narcissist that he is, decided to disregard Brewer's gracious welcome and instead chose to immediately address what he felt was the governor's negative depiction of him as "patronizing" in her book Scorpions for Breakfast.  Referring to the confrontation, Brewer said that she "felt a bit threatened, if you will, in the attitude that he had."

Exercising the type of feminist muscle liberals usually applaud, pint-sized Jan refused to be intimidated by Obama's confrontational demeanor and fought back.  Thus, the newest addition to the "That's Racist" laundry list: white governor refusing to be pushed around by black president.  And while pointing and wagging your finger in the face of anyone, let alone the president of the United States, is never a good idea, Sharpton's assertion that Brewer's spirited response to Obama's rebuke was racist is a bit over the top.

Based on the incident, Al Sharpton also flagged as racist such mildly critical terms as "thin-skinned" and feeling "a bit threatened."  Sirius XM radio host Joe Madison, who appeared on Reverend Sharpton's MSNBC show Politics Nation, contributed the following to the indictment: "unacceptable" and "disrespectful" finger-pointing, refusing to apologize, asking to see a president's college grades, and referring to President Obama by just his last name.

Speaking directly into the camera, Al Sharpton passionately addressed Jan Brewer directly, saying, "Thin-skinned?  You felt threatened?  What does that mean, you felt threatened?  By the president of the United States?  This is yet another example of disrespect and delegitimatizing this president."  Hilary O. Shelton, senior vice president for advocacy and policy at the NAACP, concurred and posed a question of his own to Brewer: "What were you afraid he would do, steal your purse?"

So, according to Al Sharpton, henceforth, if you're a petite Caucasian woman being reprimanded by a tall, imposing black president, and you're intimidated and overreact, you're a racist.

And that's not all. Al Sharpton also feels that Jan Brewer giving a handwritten letter to the president that said "I'd love an opportunity to share with you how we've been able to turn Arizona around with hard choices that turned out to be the right ones" was sort of like mentioning "food stamps" and could also be considered racist code.

Sharpton contends that Brewer's lunch/border invite was just a devious attempt to demean Barack Obama's intelligence by implying that he needed to be "lectured" and could "learn at her knee."  Thus, Al's logic seems to conclude that the Arizona governor secretly believes that, because the president is black, he's slow on the uptake and has a lot to learn.

The Right Reverend Al, who everyone knows is an expert at distinguishing truth from fiction, exposed Jan Brewer's disingenuous nature in the following way:

So, Governor Brewer, when were you telling the truth?  When you just walked out of the meeting and told the press in front of the White House, with a smile on your face, how it was cordial and how the tone was very good, positive -- or when you wrote a book saying it was condescending, and he was lecturing you?

Does anyone beside me remember a girl in large, green, plastic trash bag smeared with feces and a torso sporting upside-down racial slurs?

Respectfully pontificating about the Barack-Brewer brouhaha, Joe Madison also conveyed to Sharpton that the president was wise to walk away from a "fool."  Moreover, Madison also said he believes that people like Newt, Jan, and Joe "You Lie" Wilson are merely those "who cannot stand the fact that this is an African-American who is now one of the most powerful individuals on the planet.  And there are those who cannot consciously and subconsciously handle it."

Accusing a person of subconscious racism is almost as absurd as Sheila Jackson Lee sniffing out prejudice in cola-tinted Pepsi commercials and hurricanes that insist on being identified by names she thinks are too white.

Nevertheless, Governor Jan Brewer probably should have kept her composure during the encounter and perhaps described the incident in a way that did not include the word "threatened" -- a loaded word which could be easily misconstrued.  Yet one has to wonder if it would have even mattered to Sharpton and company -- because regardless of the circumstances, every time a conservative opens his/her mouth, derogatory racial code is all they seem to hear.

Thus, I'm sure Sheila Jackson Lee would agree with Reverend Al when he says, "They brought race in.  They put a race deck on the table.  If you pull a card, it's a race card because they set the deck."  No, it's Sharpton who put the race deck on the table, because in Al's world, it's all racist -- the cards, the deck, and the table. 

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com