Answering 9/11 with Mozart's Requiem

In spite of ten years of massive disinformation by the left and the media about the events of 9/11/01, around the United States there are September 11 ceremonies to mark what really happened.

In Oakland, California, among other cities, Mozart's Requiem is being sung, a truly fitting reaction to the barbarity of 9/11/01, because the Requiem is one of the high points of Western -- that is, Judeo-Christian -- music and art.  The barbarians do not understand this, nor do the secularists of the left.  The word "Requiem" means "May they rest in peace."  It is respectful to the dead, and its gorgeous melodies stay in the mind.  There are no greater works of art in the 25 centuries of Western tradition.

 Mozart's Requiem reiterates civilized beliefs about the human soul, and it reflects both Christian and Jewish liturgy.  This is not just secular liberalism in drag.

Grant them eternal rest, Lord,

and let perpetual light shine on them.

You are praised, God, in Zion,

and homage will be paid to You in Jerusalem.

 

Hear my prayer,

to You all flesh will come.

Grant them eternal rest, Lord,

and let perpetual light shine on them.

Following twenty centuries of Western thought, the Requiem gives hope for the resurrection of the dead, and justice for evildoers, like the mass murderers of 9/11. 

This is not sloppy, sentimental Christianity or secular liberalism parading as Judaism.  These are morally serious thoughts written by morally serious people.  The Requiem does not threaten human punishment for evil, but it promises Divine justice.

As in Handel's Messiah, it is always the trumpet that sounds the signal for resurrection and  judgment.  In Hebrew tradition, it is the shofar, long before the modern trumpet was invented.

The trumpet will send its wondrous sound

throughout the graves of the earth

and gather all before the throne. 

You may take these feelings as poetic rather than literal.  I do.  I find the Requiem expressive and healing.  Mozart's Requirem is not phony sentimentality.  It  echoes real people struggling with real loss and injustice. 

Death and nature will be astounded,

when all creation rises again,

to answer the judgement.

 

A book will be brought forth,

in which all will be written,

by which the world will be judged. 

The Book of Judgment is central in the Western imagination.  It stems from the repeated experience of injustice in life, where those who are evil and corrupt seem to get away with murder.  The Book is a promise that in the end, right will prevail.  Perhaps it does, or perhaps it doesn't, but faith in the inevitability of justice has helped make it happen many times in history.

And yet  the Requiem is not a promise of revenge.  The believer is too fallible to render judgment.  Unlike imperialistic ideologies, Western thought does not promise seventy-two virgins in Paradise for chopping off infidel heads.

What shall a wretch like me say?

Who shall intercede for me,

when even the righteous need mercy?

While the Requiem's words reflect Western thought, it's Mozart's music that makes the Requiem transcendent.  You don't really need to know a sin¢gle word.  The answers are in the music.

In New York City the political clowns can't decide what the proper memorial should be for the mass crime of 9/11/01 and its victims.  They can't tell the truth about that, even in their own shriveled minds, so that they keep going in circles.  That's pretty disgraceful.

But the solution is already here.  It comes straight from the highest achievements of Western civilization.

If you don't get a chance to go to a 9/11 memorial ceremony, you can play the Requiem for yourself.  Just allow the magic to wash over you.  It will be a healing experience.

I hope this will become an annual memorial every September 11

In spite of ten years of massive disinformation by the left and the media about the events of 9/11/01, around the United States there are September 11 ceremonies to mark what really happened.

In Oakland, California, among other cities, Mozart's Requiem is being sung, a truly fitting reaction to the barbarity of 9/11/01, because the Requiem is one of the high points of Western -- that is, Judeo-Christian -- music and art.  The barbarians do not understand this, nor do the secularists of the left.  The word "Requiem" means "May they rest in peace."  It is respectful to the dead, and its gorgeous melodies stay in the mind.  There are no greater works of art in the 25 centuries of Western tradition.

 Mozart's Requiem reiterates civilized beliefs about the human soul, and it reflects both Christian and Jewish liturgy.  This is not just secular liberalism in drag.

Grant them eternal rest, Lord,

and let perpetual light shine on them.

You are praised, God, in Zion,

and homage will be paid to You in Jerusalem.

 

Hear my prayer,

to You all flesh will come.

Grant them eternal rest, Lord,

and let perpetual light shine on them.

Following twenty centuries of Western thought, the Requiem gives hope for the resurrection of the dead, and justice for evildoers, like the mass murderers of 9/11. 

This is not sloppy, sentimental Christianity or secular liberalism parading as Judaism.  These are morally serious thoughts written by morally serious people.  The Requiem does not threaten human punishment for evil, but it promises Divine justice.

As in Handel's Messiah, it is always the trumpet that sounds the signal for resurrection and  judgment.  In Hebrew tradition, it is the shofar, long before the modern trumpet was invented.

The trumpet will send its wondrous sound

throughout the graves of the earth

and gather all before the throne. 

You may take these feelings as poetic rather than literal.  I do.  I find the Requiem expressive and healing.  Mozart's Requirem is not phony sentimentality.  It  echoes real people struggling with real loss and injustice. 

Death and nature will be astounded,

when all creation rises again,

to answer the judgement.

 

A book will be brought forth,

in which all will be written,

by which the world will be judged. 

The Book of Judgment is central in the Western imagination.  It stems from the repeated experience of injustice in life, where those who are evil and corrupt seem to get away with murder.  The Book is a promise that in the end, right will prevail.  Perhaps it does, or perhaps it doesn't, but faith in the inevitability of justice has helped make it happen many times in history.

And yet  the Requiem is not a promise of revenge.  The believer is too fallible to render judgment.  Unlike imperialistic ideologies, Western thought does not promise seventy-two virgins in Paradise for chopping off infidel heads.

What shall a wretch like me say?

Who shall intercede for me,

when even the righteous need mercy?

While the Requiem's words reflect Western thought, it's Mozart's music that makes the Requiem transcendent.  You don't really need to know a sin¢gle word.  The answers are in the music.

In New York City the political clowns can't decide what the proper memorial should be for the mass crime of 9/11/01 and its victims.  They can't tell the truth about that, even in their own shriveled minds, so that they keep going in circles.  That's pretty disgraceful.

But the solution is already here.  It comes straight from the highest achievements of Western civilization.

If you don't get a chance to go to a 9/11 memorial ceremony, you can play the Requiem for yourself.  Just allow the magic to wash over you.  It will be a healing experience.

I hope this will become an annual memorial every September 11

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