Happy 7th Birthday, American Thinker!

Congratulations to everyone at American Thinker!  AT is seven glorious years old today, so I'm blowing up lots of red, white, and blue balloons and gorging on flag-bedecked cake.

AT has become my home base, my indispensable one-stop shop for common sense in a gaga world.  I need my daily fix more than I need my morning coffee, because I was starving without it.  Here's why.

In the months after 9/11, I found myself going almost insane with hunger.  My whole body craved food in an extraordinarily vivid way.  "Eat! Eat while you can!" it shrieked at me, 24/7.  "War is coming, and you may never see food again!"

But even greater than my belly hunger was my brain hunger.  I devoured every fact I could find about the mysterious slaughter that had swooped into our lives from the clear blue sky.  Who had done this to us?  Why?  What should we do about it?  How could I help?

In my information hunger, I wolfed down the New York Times, including, of course, the editorials.  Ha!  For those of you who don't remember what America's paper of record was like in those historic years, here's a quick reminder: "Bush...squandered good will...unilateral...good will squandered...Bush... squandered...unilateral..."

One day, I was reading Thomas Friedman's latest sludge when I hit my last-straw "unilateral."  I remember throwing the paper across the room in frustration.  By then, I knew enough to realize that Friedman was flat-out lying when he claimed that our military efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq were unilateral; as of May 2002, 68 countries were lending support to Operation Enduring Freedom, and twenty coalition partners had deployed more than 16,000 troops into the region.  But what galled me more than Friedman's mendacity was his soulless stupidity: Even if his lie were true, what difference did it make if our military operations were unilateral, if they were the right thing to do?

We were living in deadly serious times, and the news was being delivered to us by sneering nitwits.  I felt as if I were literally starving for adult discourse.

Then I discovered American Thinker.  And thankfully, ever since, I've had the opposite problem: Each morning brings such a heaping feast of incisive writing that I could spend the entire day gorging on its delights, and then where would I be?  The daily AT banquet includes history, psychology, economics, linguistics, politics, theology, philosophy; its brilliant writers nourish us with everything from the most intimate confessions to clear-eyed, analytical graphs.  And of course, AT commentators bring the dessert with their richly expressive insights and wide-ranging information.  Credit goes to the gentleman and scholar at the top, AT's editor and founder, Thomas Lifson.

When I joined AT's roster in 2010, I was delighted to add my little soufflés, publicly laughing at dhimmi rabbis, grifter politicians, and loony sheiks.  Looking ahead, lots of things keep me up at night, but worrying about lack of material is not one of them.

Sadly, some day in the not-too-distant future, we may send our browsers to American Thinker and read that This site is not available.  With FCC Commissar Julius Genachowski imposing net neutrality by fiat, Saint Al Sharpton dragging Rush Limbaugh before the FCC to atone for doubleplusungood thoughts, and DHS Director Janet Napolitano waking up and chirping, "Hey, I think I'll close down 76 websites today without a court order, just for fun!" -- well, anything could happen.

Should that un-American day ever come to pass, can everyone at AT please vow to somehow, somewhere meet again?  Our model can be the samizdat, the underground publications that helped mock the Soviet empire into extinction.  I've even got our new name all worked out: SamizdAT.

But on this joyous day, with our freedom of speech still intact, please hoist a digital glass of champagne and join me in a toast: "Happy birthday, American Thinker, and long may you think!"

Stella Paul is writing The Infidel's Dictionary.  You can reach her at Stellapundit@aol.com.
Congratulations to everyone at American Thinker!  AT is seven glorious years old today, so I'm blowing up lots of red, white, and blue balloons and gorging on flag-bedecked cake.

AT has become my home base, my indispensable one-stop shop for common sense in a gaga world.  I need my daily fix more than I need my morning coffee, because I was starving without it.  Here's why.

In the months after 9/11, I found myself going almost insane with hunger.  My whole body craved food in an extraordinarily vivid way.  "Eat! Eat while you can!" it shrieked at me, 24/7.  "War is coming, and you may never see food again!"

But even greater than my belly hunger was my brain hunger.  I devoured every fact I could find about the mysterious slaughter that had swooped into our lives from the clear blue sky.  Who had done this to us?  Why?  What should we do about it?  How could I help?

In my information hunger, I wolfed down the New York Times, including, of course, the editorials.  Ha!  For those of you who don't remember what America's paper of record was like in those historic years, here's a quick reminder: "Bush...squandered good will...unilateral...good will squandered...Bush... squandered...unilateral..."

One day, I was reading Thomas Friedman's latest sludge when I hit my last-straw "unilateral."  I remember throwing the paper across the room in frustration.  By then, I knew enough to realize that Friedman was flat-out lying when he claimed that our military efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq were unilateral; as of May 2002, 68 countries were lending support to Operation Enduring Freedom, and twenty coalition partners had deployed more than 16,000 troops into the region.  But what galled me more than Friedman's mendacity was his soulless stupidity: Even if his lie were true, what difference did it make if our military operations were unilateral, if they were the right thing to do?

We were living in deadly serious times, and the news was being delivered to us by sneering nitwits.  I felt as if I were literally starving for adult discourse.

Then I discovered American Thinker.  And thankfully, ever since, I've had the opposite problem: Each morning brings such a heaping feast of incisive writing that I could spend the entire day gorging on its delights, and then where would I be?  The daily AT banquet includes history, psychology, economics, linguistics, politics, theology, philosophy; its brilliant writers nourish us with everything from the most intimate confessions to clear-eyed, analytical graphs.  And of course, AT commentators bring the dessert with their richly expressive insights and wide-ranging information.  Credit goes to the gentleman and scholar at the top, AT's editor and founder, Thomas Lifson.

When I joined AT's roster in 2010, I was delighted to add my little soufflés, publicly laughing at dhimmi rabbis, grifter politicians, and loony sheiks.  Looking ahead, lots of things keep me up at night, but worrying about lack of material is not one of them.

Sadly, some day in the not-too-distant future, we may send our browsers to American Thinker and read that This site is not available.  With FCC Commissar Julius Genachowski imposing net neutrality by fiat, Saint Al Sharpton dragging Rush Limbaugh before the FCC to atone for doubleplusungood thoughts, and DHS Director Janet Napolitano waking up and chirping, "Hey, I think I'll close down 76 websites today without a court order, just for fun!" -- well, anything could happen.

Should that un-American day ever come to pass, can everyone at AT please vow to somehow, somewhere meet again?  Our model can be the samizdat, the underground publications that helped mock the Soviet empire into extinction.  I've even got our new name all worked out: SamizdAT.

But on this joyous day, with our freedom of speech still intact, please hoist a digital glass of champagne and join me in a toast: "Happy birthday, American Thinker, and long may you think!"

Stella Paul is writing The Infidel's Dictionary.  You can reach her at Stellapundit@aol.com.