Obama in The 99th Percentile Of Islamophilia

President Barack Hussein Obama has finally found a book whose ideas he's willing to espouse other than Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals. It's The 99, and it's a comic book designed to spread tolerance for Islam. "I have to say perhaps the most innovative response [to my outreach policy] was from Dr. Naif Al-Mutawa," Obama told a recent Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship. "His comic books have captured the imagination of so many young people, they're superheroes who embody the teachings and tolerance of Islam. ..."

Let me say it is precisely because they have "captured" the imagination of so many young people that we have a problem, Houston.

The 99 is produced in Kuwait and is now scheduled to premiere on The Hub (an American television network that is a co-venture between Hasbro, the toy company, and Discovery Communications) as an animated series produced by Endemol. While Obama promotes the comic series as an honest attempt at bridging gaps, the series preview, viewable here, is anything but. Frankly, it's chilling -- in fact, breathtaking -- in its obvious intent to brainwash American children.

The video preview begins by telling the children that a group of 99 young superheroes "hold the future in their hands" but that their "struggle against evil goes back through the ages." The video then tells five-year-olds that the story begins in 13th-century Baghdad, where the "Library of Wisdom" contains a "collection of knowledge second to none" but that it isn't to last because "Mongol hordes" swept in to "destroy the empire." The invaders threw the books in the Tigris River, but Muslim scholars, who had 99 special gemstones, infused the stones with the wisdom and power of the books. Today, 99 youngsters find these stones that were scattered around the world, giving them superpowers, but the question is...who will guide these 99 heroes -- "the forces of light or the forces of darkness?"

The video tells a fictionalized historic tale of Islam, in which tolerant and open Muslim empires stretching as far as Spain were attacked by barbaric hordes ranging from the Mongols to King Ferdinand of Spain (of course, nowhere is there an honest accounting of Islam's warrior quest to invade and then dominate non-Muslim lands -- invasions that invited responses). In the video, we are treated to animated scenes of Islamic buildings and mosques on fire, but nary a mention of beheading non-Muslims for not converting to Islam once their lands were conquered or destroying churches and synagogues or converting them into victory mosques. (Picky, picky, I know, but a few facts wouldn't have hurt this venture.)

Finally, the video preview focuses on our main character, one blonde (of course) Alex Higgins, who looks and sounds like Dennis the Menace. Alex proclaims that the forces of evil have made his (WASP-y) father "into a monster." Soon, Alex is saved by the 99 and takes on the Islamic-sounding name Raquid The Watcher, gaining superpowers in the process -- he "can see and hear things that no one else can" -- as he touches one of the gemstones infused with all the knowledge and power of the Islamic books. Pretty cool, right? Well, yeah, if your goal is to teach unwitting and defenseless children that the power of the Koran translates into the ability to walk through walls and the necessity to forsake your own father. Frankly, I think it's the creator of this video who sees and hears things that no one else can...or does...or has.

Al-Mutawa, by the way, is hardly a moderate. On his website, he writes an article about considering naming his newest son Barack, after Obama. In the same article, he writes, "I received another call on my cell phone from a well-meaning relative who told me they heard I'd been blessed with another boy. ... 'You have enough boys to liberate Palestine,' he [said]. ... 'You don't need all five of my boys for that,' I replied. ‘You just need Khalid.' Khalid is my charismatic but accident-prone dynamo of a seven-year-old." He didn't tell his relative to shove it; he didn't suggest to his relative that his children shouldn't be taught to "liberate Palestine." Instead, he tried to restrict the recruitment efforts to a single son who is powerful enough to do it on his own. 

Al-Mutawa has also said that the Holocaust was the sole reason for the creation of the State of Israel, and that

one people's gain would be another people's loss. There is no escaping the fact that the creation of a homeland for the survivors of one of history's most terrible tragedies was in itself a tragedy for the existing inhabitants of that homeland, any more than we can escape the horrible reality of those who were gassed in concentration camps.  These are mutual truths.  One cannot accept one without accepting the other. 

But according to Obama, that makes him a moderate -- probably because Obama agrees with this twisted view of history, as Obama made clear in his nauseating Cairo speech, where he mirrored Al-Mutawa's language.

When he's not joking about the liberation of Palestine, Al-Mutawa is channeling Obama on "extremism." In a piece he wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, for example, Al-Mutawa stated,

My intent was to advance the notion that extremism is nothing more than a bunch of neurotransmitters working overtime -- or perhaps under time. It is not Islam or Judaism or Hinduism that creates extremism; rather, some people are predisposed to extremism and will pursue it in any faith.

His cultural relativism goes even further. In an interview with PBS, Al-Mutawa stated that "Islamist practice in Saudi is different than [sic] Islamist practice in Milan. It's different than [sic] in Malaysia and Indonesia. It's not better. It's not worse. It's different." 

This is typical politically correct hogwash.  Presumably, Islamist practice in Milan does not incorporate beheadings and fatal stonings, but Al-Mutawa says that it is merely "different" from Saudi practice. Certainly this is no way to confront or describe radical Islam.

But that's not truly Al-Mutawa's goal. If it were, he'd take on radical Islam directly rather than preach to the West. Nobody here is interested in proselytizing Islamic superheroes any more than they're interested in proselytizing Jewish superheroes. But members of the industry apparently feel obligated to network with Al-Mutawa to gain the support of the PC community.

What's the problem, you ask? The problem is that another generation of American children will be indoctrinated to believe that all of Islam is by nature moderate and peaceful, and a victim of (Western) evil-doers throughout their history -- a proposition for which there is little or no evidence. Yes, there are moderate and peaceful Muslims, but the doctrine of jihad provides a sea of people who wish that America, Israel, and Western culture would disappear under the rising tide of political Islam. 

It was Vladimir Lenin, the founder of the Bolshevik party, who said, "Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted." The election of our dhimmi president guaranteed the forces of radical Islam at least four years to sow their seeds.

Carol A. Taber is president of FamilySecurityMatters.org.
President Barack Hussein Obama has finally found a book whose ideas he's willing to espouse other than Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals. It's The 99, and it's a comic book designed to spread tolerance for Islam. "I have to say perhaps the most innovative response [to my outreach policy] was from Dr. Naif Al-Mutawa," Obama told a recent Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship. "His comic books have captured the imagination of so many young people, they're superheroes who embody the teachings and tolerance of Islam. ..."

Let me say it is precisely because they have "captured" the imagination of so many young people that we have a problem, Houston.

The 99 is produced in Kuwait and is now scheduled to premiere on The Hub (an American television network that is a co-venture between Hasbro, the toy company, and Discovery Communications) as an animated series produced by Endemol. While Obama promotes the comic series as an honest attempt at bridging gaps, the series preview, viewable here, is anything but. Frankly, it's chilling -- in fact, breathtaking -- in its obvious intent to brainwash American children.

The video preview begins by telling the children that a group of 99 young superheroes "hold the future in their hands" but that their "struggle against evil goes back through the ages." The video then tells five-year-olds that the story begins in 13th-century Baghdad, where the "Library of Wisdom" contains a "collection of knowledge second to none" but that it isn't to last because "Mongol hordes" swept in to "destroy the empire." The invaders threw the books in the Tigris River, but Muslim scholars, who had 99 special gemstones, infused the stones with the wisdom and power of the books. Today, 99 youngsters find these stones that were scattered around the world, giving them superpowers, but the question is...who will guide these 99 heroes -- "the forces of light or the forces of darkness?"

The video tells a fictionalized historic tale of Islam, in which tolerant and open Muslim empires stretching as far as Spain were attacked by barbaric hordes ranging from the Mongols to King Ferdinand of Spain (of course, nowhere is there an honest accounting of Islam's warrior quest to invade and then dominate non-Muslim lands -- invasions that invited responses). In the video, we are treated to animated scenes of Islamic buildings and mosques on fire, but nary a mention of beheading non-Muslims for not converting to Islam once their lands were conquered or destroying churches and synagogues or converting them into victory mosques. (Picky, picky, I know, but a few facts wouldn't have hurt this venture.)

Finally, the video preview focuses on our main character, one blonde (of course) Alex Higgins, who looks and sounds like Dennis the Menace. Alex proclaims that the forces of evil have made his (WASP-y) father "into a monster." Soon, Alex is saved by the 99 and takes on the Islamic-sounding name Raquid The Watcher, gaining superpowers in the process -- he "can see and hear things that no one else can" -- as he touches one of the gemstones infused with all the knowledge and power of the Islamic books. Pretty cool, right? Well, yeah, if your goal is to teach unwitting and defenseless children that the power of the Koran translates into the ability to walk through walls and the necessity to forsake your own father. Frankly, I think it's the creator of this video who sees and hears things that no one else can...or does...or has.

Al-Mutawa, by the way, is hardly a moderate. On his website, he writes an article about considering naming his newest son Barack, after Obama. In the same article, he writes, "I received another call on my cell phone from a well-meaning relative who told me they heard I'd been blessed with another boy. ... 'You have enough boys to liberate Palestine,' he [said]. ... 'You don't need all five of my boys for that,' I replied. ‘You just need Khalid.' Khalid is my charismatic but accident-prone dynamo of a seven-year-old." He didn't tell his relative to shove it; he didn't suggest to his relative that his children shouldn't be taught to "liberate Palestine." Instead, he tried to restrict the recruitment efforts to a single son who is powerful enough to do it on his own. 

Al-Mutawa has also said that the Holocaust was the sole reason for the creation of the State of Israel, and that

one people's gain would be another people's loss. There is no escaping the fact that the creation of a homeland for the survivors of one of history's most terrible tragedies was in itself a tragedy for the existing inhabitants of that homeland, any more than we can escape the horrible reality of those who were gassed in concentration camps.  These are mutual truths.  One cannot accept one without accepting the other. 

But according to Obama, that makes him a moderate -- probably because Obama agrees with this twisted view of history, as Obama made clear in his nauseating Cairo speech, where he mirrored Al-Mutawa's language.

When he's not joking about the liberation of Palestine, Al-Mutawa is channeling Obama on "extremism." In a piece he wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, for example, Al-Mutawa stated,

My intent was to advance the notion that extremism is nothing more than a bunch of neurotransmitters working overtime -- or perhaps under time. It is not Islam or Judaism or Hinduism that creates extremism; rather, some people are predisposed to extremism and will pursue it in any faith.

His cultural relativism goes even further. In an interview with PBS, Al-Mutawa stated that "Islamist practice in Saudi is different than [sic] Islamist practice in Milan. It's different than [sic] in Malaysia and Indonesia. It's not better. It's not worse. It's different." 

This is typical politically correct hogwash.  Presumably, Islamist practice in Milan does not incorporate beheadings and fatal stonings, but Al-Mutawa says that it is merely "different" from Saudi practice. Certainly this is no way to confront or describe radical Islam.

But that's not truly Al-Mutawa's goal. If it were, he'd take on radical Islam directly rather than preach to the West. Nobody here is interested in proselytizing Islamic superheroes any more than they're interested in proselytizing Jewish superheroes. But members of the industry apparently feel obligated to network with Al-Mutawa to gain the support of the PC community.

What's the problem, you ask? The problem is that another generation of American children will be indoctrinated to believe that all of Islam is by nature moderate and peaceful, and a victim of (Western) evil-doers throughout their history -- a proposition for which there is little or no evidence. Yes, there are moderate and peaceful Muslims, but the doctrine of jihad provides a sea of people who wish that America, Israel, and Western culture would disappear under the rising tide of political Islam. 

It was Vladimir Lenin, the founder of the Bolshevik party, who said, "Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted." The election of our dhimmi president guaranteed the forces of radical Islam at least four years to sow their seeds.

Carol A. Taber is president of FamilySecurityMatters.org.

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