More Truth in Political Advertising

While the idea that the majority of politicians can or will ever tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth is absurd, there is something very, very simple we can do.

Liberal Democrats and Blue Dog Democrats alike are using an old trick. They're running away from Obama and their party. They're not declaring themselves Democrats in their advertising. They're using red in their posters. They're still telling half-truths and outright lies about their voting records in a desperate attempt to stay in office, and above all -- they're avoiding that poison pill called Obamacare.

While candidates on all sides often fail to state which party they represent because of the negativity associated with political parties (imagine that), a simple campaign reform law could change that. 

It would be relatively easy to add an amendment to any campaign reform bill that would make it a federal law compelling every candidate for public office to declare his or her party (if he or she has one). The name of the party should be prominently and clearly displayed or declared in all forms of advertising -- radio, TV, print, billboards, and flyers. This is one simple way to help avoid deliberate attempts by many candidates to confuse voters and hide loyalties. Candidates and parties won't like this law at all, but we are not here for them, are we? They are here for us, and so they must bend to our will. 

People deserve to know whether someone is a Democrat, a Socialist, with La Raza Unida, a New Black Panther, or with the Communist Party. Or a Republican. When you see four different fifteen- to twenty-second commercials in a row, something this simple can make a big difference. The cost is negligible. The impact is big.

Obfuscation is the lifeblood of politics. We are bombarded with dozens of ads and names during election season. In the past, we often had no idea who the incumbent was or who his opponent was. We tried to ignore politics as much as possible for many years, and we now realize the price we must pay for that folly. In local elections, where name recognition is much weaker and party more vital, similar state laws would help us identify the political philosophies we support and whom we wanted to find out more about before we voted. Again, the impact in relation to the minimal effort is off the chart.

Now, because we are so angry at government overreach and overspending, many more have become involved. We know who our representatives are and who their potential replacements are. We have a duty to investigate and know the candidates, to be informed voters. But reality is reality. Too many "couch potatoes" still don't know, and they can vote, too. For a nation that was the model of true representative government in the world to have less than 50% voter turnout in elections is disgraceful. We should have 60%, 70%, or even 80% turnout as a nation. Why not?

With this simple but effective act, I believe we can help change that. The philosophies of the two major political parties have never been more starkly contrasted. The Tea Parties are determined to remake the GOP into a true people's party, representing the majority center-right position of our population. 

Conservatism fits that majority-model position best -- small, limited government; responsible, balanced budget; strong defense; and elimination of waste. Finding out who's who is a major step toward bringing in an even larger voter turnout in American elections, regardless of the party they vote for.

More than TARP, the Stimulus, the GM takeover, the czars, or the unbridled spending and unlimited taxation pouring out of Washington from Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, and their willing cronies, ObamaCare has come to symbolize -- and more importantly, crystallize -- America's rage at being ignored by our government. And we can't wait to vote.

Early voting polling is reflecting high turnout all across the country. Even voter turnout in traditionally deep-blue counties -- like Travis County, Texas, where a Democrat has sat in the congressional seat for over forty years -- are seeing major increases in early voting. First-day turnout in Travis County was over ten thousand voters, double the last midterm in 2006.

Now, please -- go vote. 

And when you're done, call a friend and ask him to vote, too.
While the idea that the majority of politicians can or will ever tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth is absurd, there is something very, very simple we can do.

Liberal Democrats and Blue Dog Democrats alike are using an old trick. They're running away from Obama and their party. They're not declaring themselves Democrats in their advertising. They're using red in their posters. They're still telling half-truths and outright lies about their voting records in a desperate attempt to stay in office, and above all -- they're avoiding that poison pill called Obamacare.

While candidates on all sides often fail to state which party they represent because of the negativity associated with political parties (imagine that), a simple campaign reform law could change that. 

It would be relatively easy to add an amendment to any campaign reform bill that would make it a federal law compelling every candidate for public office to declare his or her party (if he or she has one). The name of the party should be prominently and clearly displayed or declared in all forms of advertising -- radio, TV, print, billboards, and flyers. This is one simple way to help avoid deliberate attempts by many candidates to confuse voters and hide loyalties. Candidates and parties won't like this law at all, but we are not here for them, are we? They are here for us, and so they must bend to our will. 

People deserve to know whether someone is a Democrat, a Socialist, with La Raza Unida, a New Black Panther, or with the Communist Party. Or a Republican. When you see four different fifteen- to twenty-second commercials in a row, something this simple can make a big difference. The cost is negligible. The impact is big.

Obfuscation is the lifeblood of politics. We are bombarded with dozens of ads and names during election season. In the past, we often had no idea who the incumbent was or who his opponent was. We tried to ignore politics as much as possible for many years, and we now realize the price we must pay for that folly. In local elections, where name recognition is much weaker and party more vital, similar state laws would help us identify the political philosophies we support and whom we wanted to find out more about before we voted. Again, the impact in relation to the minimal effort is off the chart.

Now, because we are so angry at government overreach and overspending, many more have become involved. We know who our representatives are and who their potential replacements are. We have a duty to investigate and know the candidates, to be informed voters. But reality is reality. Too many "couch potatoes" still don't know, and they can vote, too. For a nation that was the model of true representative government in the world to have less than 50% voter turnout in elections is disgraceful. We should have 60%, 70%, or even 80% turnout as a nation. Why not?

With this simple but effective act, I believe we can help change that. The philosophies of the two major political parties have never been more starkly contrasted. The Tea Parties are determined to remake the GOP into a true people's party, representing the majority center-right position of our population. 

Conservatism fits that majority-model position best -- small, limited government; responsible, balanced budget; strong defense; and elimination of waste. Finding out who's who is a major step toward bringing in an even larger voter turnout in American elections, regardless of the party they vote for.

More than TARP, the Stimulus, the GM takeover, the czars, or the unbridled spending and unlimited taxation pouring out of Washington from Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, and their willing cronies, ObamaCare has come to symbolize -- and more importantly, crystallize -- America's rage at being ignored by our government. And we can't wait to vote.

Early voting polling is reflecting high turnout all across the country. Even voter turnout in traditionally deep-blue counties -- like Travis County, Texas, where a Democrat has sat in the congressional seat for over forty years -- are seeing major increases in early voting. First-day turnout in Travis County was over ten thousand voters, double the last midterm in 2006.

Now, please -- go vote. 

And when you're done, call a friend and ask him to vote, too.