Genuine Institutionalized Racism

Charges of racism by America's so-called black leaders -- namely, the Reverends Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson and the NAACP -- increase with nauseating frequency as the Obama presidency founders. Comedian Bill Cosby leads the serious conversation about a segment of the black community's self-inflicted racism that encourages a culture of underachievement.

Middle-class and above black families are labeled "Uncle Toms," "Bougie," or "acting white" unless they pass the "genuine blackness" litmus test. Members of my family have been called these names. Many school-aged black children succumb by shedding non-black friendships, underperforming academically, speaking "Ebonics," or adopting prison-influenced dress codes.

There is also external institutionalized racism hindering blacks in America. Claims about how racism developed distract us from its true sources. The hot political issues of school vouchers and abortion reveal anomalies that warrant serious investigation.

The black community should ask why both the Democratic Party and black leaders oppose school vouchers and support abortion.  Both the Party and black leaders mysteriously and doggedly hold positions on the issues that work against the black community.   

For instance, school voucher programs, which have been implemented despite enormous hurdles, have freed many black inner-city children from their failed neighborhood public school systems. It is the Democratic Party, not the Republican Party, which erects these hurdles.  

Further, many Americans associate abortion and Roe v. Wade with the feminist movement, which is politically allied with the Democrats. Why? The horrific reality is twofold. First, the push for legalized abortion is rooted in America's eugenics movement, which was founded by Margaret Sanger and targeted the black community. Second, the Democratic Party is somehow home to both Sanger's staunchest admirers and the overwhelming majority of America's black voters. 

The Democratic Party opposes school voucher programs allowing private school options. President Obama in 2009 let a successful school voucher program in Washington, D.C. lapse at the behest of teachers unions and over the objections of black inner-city mothers. 

The "showdown at the school-voucher corral" was tailor-made for the Democratic Party and black leaders to ride in on their white donkeys and snatch victory from the jaws of defeat for a segment of its key voting bloc, D.C.'s black community. America would have cheered had President Obama told the teachers unions they must face market competition like private-sector employees to improve the quality of public education. But that didn't happen. 

In this instance, the disadvantaged black population, comprising people who typically vote for Democrats and look to black leaders to fight for them, was left hanging by its own party and leaders. It must have been a slap in the face to these black inner-city mothers when Obama chose a private D.C. school for his daughters. The president, whom most black Americans voted to elect, helped end the very program that potentially allowed these Americans' disadvantaged children to choose the same private school that his daughters attend.

The Republican Party supports school vouchers, but that, along with Michael Steele as RNC head, isn't enough to win more black voters. Yes, the Democratic Party won over blacks in the 1960s with LBJ's "Great Society." Democrats successfully branded the Republican Party as racist because it became the home of former "Dixiecrat" Strom Thurmond and former Klansman David Duke (despite the fact that there were more Democrats known as racists). The Republican Party's major barrier to inroads into the black community is that, to the Party's credit, it refuses to pander to blacks by encouraging the paternalistic "government-solves-all" attitude of the Democratic Party.

The Democratic Party also relies on black leaders' intimidation tactics to maintain a stranglehold on the black vote. With the Democratic Party's blessing, black leaders engineered a vicious campaign during the 2000 presidential campaign to demonize George W. Bush, a decent man who is gracious to a fault to his political enemies. Though he prevailed by virtue of the Electoral College vote, Bush lost the popular vote and attracted only 9% of the black vote, far below the 30% he gained running for governor of Texas. If the Republicans had attracted a significant portion of the black vote, there would have been no need for the Florida recounts. But the NAACP's commercial tying Bush's opposition to hate-crimes legislation in Texas to James Byrd's racially motivated death helped make Bush radioactive.

After Bush became president, Democratic Party and black leaders demonized his black appointees. Among other things, the Democrats didn't acknowledge the historical significance of Bush's appointing Colin Powell and Condi Rice as the first African-American Secretaries of State of both genders. They said nothing when Harry Belafonte said Powell was Bush's "house slave" or when Wisconsin radio personality John Sylvester called Condi Rice "Aunt Jemima." By their reticence, black leaders confirmed loudly and clearly what most of America assumes: you are free to move about the country only as a Democrat, or a Democrat appointee.

Regarding abortion, the black community should question why the Democratic Party and black leaders, as well as President Obama, shroud in secrecy the racist background of Planned Parenthood and its founder, the late Margaret Sanger. The Radiance Foundation's website reveals how Sanger's "Negro Project" strategically placed Planned Parenthood clinics near black neighborhoods.  Sanger shrewdly used the black church and black elite network to promote ersatz benefits of birth control, including contraception and sterilization, in order to steer black mothers to her clinics. But, after Roe v. Wade passed in 1973, Planned Parenthood's counselors were now legally empowered to include abortion as a birth control method, and, as a result, to seek ways to persuade black women to abort their babies.

The Radiance Foundation's research clearly confirms that Sanger's legacy is the reason why a disproportionally high 40% of black pregnancies end in abortion. Sanger's legacy also may explain why Planned Parenthood's internet commercial included black athletes Al Joyner and Sean James to respond to Focus on the Family's pro-life Super Bowl commercial featuring Tim Tebow.

The NAACP's mining the Tea Party and "The Glenn Beck Program" for racism is a distraction. The mother lode of racism appears to be in the leadership circles of the Democratic Party and the self-appointed black leaders who protect Planned Parenthood and Margaret Sanger, whose influence continues from her grave. Black America should view with suspicion many players who share their political party: NARAL, NOW, et al; Hillary Clinton's acceptance of the Sanger award in 2009; President Obama, Reverends Sharpton and Jackson, and the NAACP that accepts Planned Parenthood as a political ally.

rev. 9/19/10
Charges of racism by America's so-called black leaders -- namely, the Reverends Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson and the NAACP -- increase with nauseating frequency as the Obama presidency founders. Comedian Bill Cosby leads the serious conversation about a segment of the black community's self-inflicted racism that encourages a culture of underachievement.

Middle-class and above black families are labeled "Uncle Toms," "Bougie," or "acting white" unless they pass the "genuine blackness" litmus test. Members of my family have been called these names. Many school-aged black children succumb by shedding non-black friendships, underperforming academically, speaking "Ebonics," or adopting prison-influenced dress codes.

There is also external institutionalized racism hindering blacks in America. Claims about how racism developed distract us from its true sources. The hot political issues of school vouchers and abortion reveal anomalies that warrant serious investigation.

The black community should ask why both the Democratic Party and black leaders oppose school vouchers and support abortion.  Both the Party and black leaders mysteriously and doggedly hold positions on the issues that work against the black community.   

For instance, school voucher programs, which have been implemented despite enormous hurdles, have freed many black inner-city children from their failed neighborhood public school systems. It is the Democratic Party, not the Republican Party, which erects these hurdles.  

Further, many Americans associate abortion and Roe v. Wade with the feminist movement, which is politically allied with the Democrats. Why? The horrific reality is twofold. First, the push for legalized abortion is rooted in America's eugenics movement, which was founded by Margaret Sanger and targeted the black community. Second, the Democratic Party is somehow home to both Sanger's staunchest admirers and the overwhelming majority of America's black voters. 

The Democratic Party opposes school voucher programs allowing private school options. President Obama in 2009 let a successful school voucher program in Washington, D.C. lapse at the behest of teachers unions and over the objections of black inner-city mothers. 

The "showdown at the school-voucher corral" was tailor-made for the Democratic Party and black leaders to ride in on their white donkeys and snatch victory from the jaws of defeat for a segment of its key voting bloc, D.C.'s black community. America would have cheered had President Obama told the teachers unions they must face market competition like private-sector employees to improve the quality of public education. But that didn't happen. 

In this instance, the disadvantaged black population, comprising people who typically vote for Democrats and look to black leaders to fight for them, was left hanging by its own party and leaders. It must have been a slap in the face to these black inner-city mothers when Obama chose a private D.C. school for his daughters. The president, whom most black Americans voted to elect, helped end the very program that potentially allowed these Americans' disadvantaged children to choose the same private school that his daughters attend.

The Republican Party supports school vouchers, but that, along with Michael Steele as RNC head, isn't enough to win more black voters. Yes, the Democratic Party won over blacks in the 1960s with LBJ's "Great Society." Democrats successfully branded the Republican Party as racist because it became the home of former "Dixiecrat" Strom Thurmond and former Klansman David Duke (despite the fact that there were more Democrats known as racists). The Republican Party's major barrier to inroads into the black community is that, to the Party's credit, it refuses to pander to blacks by encouraging the paternalistic "government-solves-all" attitude of the Democratic Party.

The Democratic Party also relies on black leaders' intimidation tactics to maintain a stranglehold on the black vote. With the Democratic Party's blessing, black leaders engineered a vicious campaign during the 2000 presidential campaign to demonize George W. Bush, a decent man who is gracious to a fault to his political enemies. Though he prevailed by virtue of the Electoral College vote, Bush lost the popular vote and attracted only 9% of the black vote, far below the 30% he gained running for governor of Texas. If the Republicans had attracted a significant portion of the black vote, there would have been no need for the Florida recounts. But the NAACP's commercial tying Bush's opposition to hate-crimes legislation in Texas to James Byrd's racially motivated death helped make Bush radioactive.

After Bush became president, Democratic Party and black leaders demonized his black appointees. Among other things, the Democrats didn't acknowledge the historical significance of Bush's appointing Colin Powell and Condi Rice as the first African-American Secretaries of State of both genders. They said nothing when Harry Belafonte said Powell was Bush's "house slave" or when Wisconsin radio personality John Sylvester called Condi Rice "Aunt Jemima." By their reticence, black leaders confirmed loudly and clearly what most of America assumes: you are free to move about the country only as a Democrat, or a Democrat appointee.

Regarding abortion, the black community should question why the Democratic Party and black leaders, as well as President Obama, shroud in secrecy the racist background of Planned Parenthood and its founder, the late Margaret Sanger. The Radiance Foundation's website reveals how Sanger's "Negro Project" strategically placed Planned Parenthood clinics near black neighborhoods.  Sanger shrewdly used the black church and black elite network to promote ersatz benefits of birth control, including contraception and sterilization, in order to steer black mothers to her clinics. But, after Roe v. Wade passed in 1973, Planned Parenthood's counselors were now legally empowered to include abortion as a birth control method, and, as a result, to seek ways to persuade black women to abort their babies.

The Radiance Foundation's research clearly confirms that Sanger's legacy is the reason why a disproportionally high 40% of black pregnancies end in abortion. Sanger's legacy also may explain why Planned Parenthood's internet commercial included black athletes Al Joyner and Sean James to respond to Focus on the Family's pro-life Super Bowl commercial featuring Tim Tebow.

The NAACP's mining the Tea Party and "The Glenn Beck Program" for racism is a distraction. The mother lode of racism appears to be in the leadership circles of the Democratic Party and the self-appointed black leaders who protect Planned Parenthood and Margaret Sanger, whose influence continues from her grave. Black America should view with suspicion many players who share their political party: NARAL, NOW, et al; Hillary Clinton's acceptance of the Sanger award in 2009; President Obama, Reverends Sharpton and Jackson, and the NAACP that accepts Planned Parenthood as a political ally.

rev. 9/19/10