Jump Shots from the Left

America found out in a probing CBS interview with "Early Show" co-anchor Harry Smith an interesting fact: Barack Obama is a southpaw. Yes, the lefty president is "left-handed." Barry claims, of course, to be ambidextrous when on the basketball court, able to make jump shots from both the right and the left.

Smith joined Obama on the hot blacktop, commenting on his smooth moves. Following the agile Obama around the court, the "Early Show" co-anchor acknowledged Barack's natural tendency to go left, but queried the sprightly president with extremely controversial questions like, "Can you ever go right?" Obama's response provided a glimpse into his honest nature, which this time was couched in a smirky reply: "I can go to my right, but I prefer my left." Ya think?

After failing to make his famous jump shot, Obama's excused himself, claiming, "You know, I've got a few other things on my mind." After which a determined Mr. Obama successfully accomplished the jump shot. "Its like health care. I always come from behind -- I finish strong."

It figures: Barry is involved in a solitary game concerned only with accomplishing individual policy goals. Obama plays politics as he plays basketball, and he makes jump shots from the left. If he misses, he shoots from the left until rebounding from legislative fouls, with a finish he himself perceives as "strong."

Harry Smith pressed in hard on Obama in the journalistic one-on-one strolling and asking the president if he's "aware of the extreme terms some use to describe him, such as a socialist or Nazi[.]"

Well, I think that when you listen to Rush Limbaugh or Glenn Beck, it's pretty apparent, and it's troublesome, but keep in mind that there have been periods in American history where this kind of vitriol comes out.

Was the president admitting to Harry that between 12:00 noon and 3:00 pm, he tunes in to EIB's Maha Rushie? Does Obama catch Glenn Beck on Fox News? Why would a former college professor be bothered by intellectual curiosity, well-researched documentation, and freedom of speech? And why hasn't Obama called Beck on the red telephone to address the troublesome vitriol? And what of the President's own comments urging supporters to "get in their faces" with ObamaCare critics?

Casually conversing with Smith, Mr. Obama explained away opposition, saying, "It happens often when you've got an economy that is making people more anxious, and ... feeling like there is a lot of change that needs to take place." Referencing the trusty "change" catchphrase, Obama excused himself, choosing to continue to shoot from the left.

While a majority of Americans disapprove of the job Obama's doing, playing hoops with his own shadow, Obama maintained, "But that's not the vast majority of Americans." Dribbling as he went along, Barack Obama put words in the mouth of Americans with the same vigor with which he endorsed the unpopular health care reform bill.

On-the-job training trumps experience because "trying and wanting" made Obama a star on the basketball court. Unashamed Obama extended similar sentiments to the Executive Office, telling Harry Smith, "I think the vast majority of Americans know that we're trying hard [and] that I want what's best for the country."

The same Obama that willingly accepted the Democrat nomination astride two Greek Ionic columns at INVESCO Field attempted to convince Smith he didn't "buy all the hype, right after inauguration, where everybody was only saying nice things about me." The president tenaciously shot and reshot the basketball toward the hoop, finally adding, "And I don't get too worried when things aren't going as well because I know that over time, these things turn." And with Barack Obama, rest assured that the "turn" will always be to the left.

Author's content: jeannie-ology.com
America found out in a probing CBS interview with "Early Show" co-anchor Harry Smith an interesting fact: Barack Obama is a southpaw. Yes, the lefty president is "left-handed." Barry claims, of course, to be ambidextrous when on the basketball court, able to make jump shots from both the right and the left.

Smith joined Obama on the hot blacktop, commenting on his smooth moves. Following the agile Obama around the court, the "Early Show" co-anchor acknowledged Barack's natural tendency to go left, but queried the sprightly president with extremely controversial questions like, "Can you ever go right?" Obama's response provided a glimpse into his honest nature, which this time was couched in a smirky reply: "I can go to my right, but I prefer my left." Ya think?

After failing to make his famous jump shot, Obama's excused himself, claiming, "You know, I've got a few other things on my mind." After which a determined Mr. Obama successfully accomplished the jump shot. "Its like health care. I always come from behind -- I finish strong."

It figures: Barry is involved in a solitary game concerned only with accomplishing individual policy goals. Obama plays politics as he plays basketball, and he makes jump shots from the left. If he misses, he shoots from the left until rebounding from legislative fouls, with a finish he himself perceives as "strong."

Harry Smith pressed in hard on Obama in the journalistic one-on-one strolling and asking the president if he's "aware of the extreme terms some use to describe him, such as a socialist or Nazi[.]"

Well, I think that when you listen to Rush Limbaugh or Glenn Beck, it's pretty apparent, and it's troublesome, but keep in mind that there have been periods in American history where this kind of vitriol comes out.

Was the president admitting to Harry that between 12:00 noon and 3:00 pm, he tunes in to EIB's Maha Rushie? Does Obama catch Glenn Beck on Fox News? Why would a former college professor be bothered by intellectual curiosity, well-researched documentation, and freedom of speech? And why hasn't Obama called Beck on the red telephone to address the troublesome vitriol? And what of the President's own comments urging supporters to "get in their faces" with ObamaCare critics?

Casually conversing with Smith, Mr. Obama explained away opposition, saying, "It happens often when you've got an economy that is making people more anxious, and ... feeling like there is a lot of change that needs to take place." Referencing the trusty "change" catchphrase, Obama excused himself, choosing to continue to shoot from the left.

While a majority of Americans disapprove of the job Obama's doing, playing hoops with his own shadow, Obama maintained, "But that's not the vast majority of Americans." Dribbling as he went along, Barack Obama put words in the mouth of Americans with the same vigor with which he endorsed the unpopular health care reform bill.

On-the-job training trumps experience because "trying and wanting" made Obama a star on the basketball court. Unashamed Obama extended similar sentiments to the Executive Office, telling Harry Smith, "I think the vast majority of Americans know that we're trying hard [and] that I want what's best for the country."

The same Obama that willingly accepted the Democrat nomination astride two Greek Ionic columns at INVESCO Field attempted to convince Smith he didn't "buy all the hype, right after inauguration, where everybody was only saying nice things about me." The president tenaciously shot and reshot the basketball toward the hoop, finally adding, "And I don't get too worried when things aren't going as well because I know that over time, these things turn." And with Barack Obama, rest assured that the "turn" will always be to the left.

Author's content: jeannie-ology.com

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