The Array of WH ObamaCare Tactics Grows

The White House is deploying an array of tactics to promote ObamaCare.

Here's the list to date.

1.  Warn about the cost of inaction.  Or the, "Sure it's expensive, but just think of how much it'll cost if we don't do anything!" argument. It's a false dichotomy. Many of those who oppose Obamacare believe healthcare reform is in order - just not the nationalized medicine approach proposed by Obama and the Democrats.

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. President Obama appears to have fixed on a new strategy to counter what he has called fear-mongering by his opponents in the national health care debate: Try to convince the public that making no change would be scarier. (Source)

2.  Use Grandma to build empathy through association.  Or the "I wouldn't deny healthcare to the elderly for I once had a sick grandma, too" argument. 

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. | President Obama for the first time invoked the death of his own grandmother to strike back against opponents of his health care plan who have tried to claim it would create government "death panels" to "pull the plug on grandma." (Source)

3.  Accuse opponents of racial prejudice - play the race card.  In an article entitled "Fear for Obama's Safety Grows as Hate Groups Thrive on Racial Backlash," ABC News alleged a link between racial prejudice and anti-Obamacare sentiments.

Experts who track hate groups across the U.S. are growing increasingly concerned over violent rhetoric targeted at President Obama, especially as the debate over health care intensifies and a pattern of threats emerges.

4.  Shift the focus of the debate.  The White House has shifted the focus away from the positive - improving healthcare for all Americans - to a negative - reining in the evil health insurance industry.

5.  When accused of having a controversial proposal, just say "No we don't."  This tactic is popular with some Senators and Representatives when constituents push back against specific proposals in Obamacare.  It's the "No, it doesn't say that" response. It's dependent on tactic #6.

6.  Hide the plan.  When the House version of the plan is criticized, just say that the Senate has a different version, but then don't reveal that version. And, if you're Obama, say, "Well, that's not in my plan."  It's all a shell game - plan, plan, who's got the plan?

7.  Hide key congressional proponents.  For example, Rep. Harry Teague (D. NM) is just one among those Democrat members of Congress hiding from their constituents during the recess. Callers asking to know his schedule are referred to the Congressman's website for a list of town hall meetings on ObamaCare. His last "Harry in your hometown" event was August 8th. Where's Harry now?

Congressman Dennis Cardoza (D. CA.) is also hiding from his constituents. According to the Merced County News:

Normally this is the one time of the year that we can expect to hear from our Congressman. Traditionally there are Town Hall meetings to give the constituents a one on one with their Congress in discussion of the various topics being debated on Capitol Hill.  Our Congressman Dennis Cardoza says there will be no Town Hall meetings. He is not expected to return to Merced County over the summer recess.

8.  Pretend to give up on controversial issues that were never acknowledged in the first place.  We've heard that the alleged Senate bill has omitted the controversial "death committee" provision that was never acknowledged to have existed in the first place. This offers the illusion of compromise.

9. Hold pro-Obamacare pep rallies that profess to be open town hall-like events. Obama is reverting to the campaign style that brought him success during the election.  Fill a room full of supporters, answer stacked questions, claim that support is widespread, and attempt to build positive momentum.

10. Blame the media for focusing on the opponents.  Since the legacy media is decidedly pro-Obama, this accusation doesn't provoke their ire. It should, but it doesn't.

11. Demonize the opposition.  This is, perhaps, the most consistent and frequently used tactic designed to weaken the opposition to Obamacare. Rush Limbaugh is accused of inflammatory language, and his alleged minions dutifully march into the contentious town hall meetings that surface on YouTube.

12. Make false claims for Obamacare.  This tactic is close to #5.  It's represents the dissemination of misinformation about the House bill, pertaining to the bill's costs and provisions. This tactic provoked angry pushback at some town hall meetings. People had read the bill, while their congressional member clearly had not.

So what other tactics are yet to be deployed? 
The White House is deploying an array of tactics to promote ObamaCare.

Here's the list to date.

1.  Warn about the cost of inaction.  Or the, "Sure it's expensive, but just think of how much it'll cost if we don't do anything!" argument. It's a false dichotomy. Many of those who oppose Obamacare believe healthcare reform is in order - just not the nationalized medicine approach proposed by Obama and the Democrats.

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. President Obama appears to have fixed on a new strategy to counter what he has called fear-mongering by his opponents in the national health care debate: Try to convince the public that making no change would be scarier. (Source)

2.  Use Grandma to build empathy through association.  Or the "I wouldn't deny healthcare to the elderly for I once had a sick grandma, too" argument. 

GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. | President Obama for the first time invoked the death of his own grandmother to strike back against opponents of his health care plan who have tried to claim it would create government "death panels" to "pull the plug on grandma." (Source)

3.  Accuse opponents of racial prejudice - play the race card.  In an article entitled "Fear for Obama's Safety Grows as Hate Groups Thrive on Racial Backlash," ABC News alleged a link between racial prejudice and anti-Obamacare sentiments.

Experts who track hate groups across the U.S. are growing increasingly concerned over violent rhetoric targeted at President Obama, especially as the debate over health care intensifies and a pattern of threats emerges.

4.  Shift the focus of the debate.  The White House has shifted the focus away from the positive - improving healthcare for all Americans - to a negative - reining in the evil health insurance industry.

5.  When accused of having a controversial proposal, just say "No we don't."  This tactic is popular with some Senators and Representatives when constituents push back against specific proposals in Obamacare.  It's the "No, it doesn't say that" response. It's dependent on tactic #6.

6.  Hide the plan.  When the House version of the plan is criticized, just say that the Senate has a different version, but then don't reveal that version. And, if you're Obama, say, "Well, that's not in my plan."  It's all a shell game - plan, plan, who's got the plan?

7.  Hide key congressional proponents.  For example, Rep. Harry Teague (D. NM) is just one among those Democrat members of Congress hiding from their constituents during the recess. Callers asking to know his schedule are referred to the Congressman's website for a list of town hall meetings on ObamaCare. His last "Harry in your hometown" event was August 8th. Where's Harry now?

Congressman Dennis Cardoza (D. CA.) is also hiding from his constituents. According to the Merced County News:

Normally this is the one time of the year that we can expect to hear from our Congressman. Traditionally there are Town Hall meetings to give the constituents a one on one with their Congress in discussion of the various topics being debated on Capitol Hill.  Our Congressman Dennis Cardoza says there will be no Town Hall meetings. He is not expected to return to Merced County over the summer recess.

8.  Pretend to give up on controversial issues that were never acknowledged in the first place.  We've heard that the alleged Senate bill has omitted the controversial "death committee" provision that was never acknowledged to have existed in the first place. This offers the illusion of compromise.

9. Hold pro-Obamacare pep rallies that profess to be open town hall-like events. Obama is reverting to the campaign style that brought him success during the election.  Fill a room full of supporters, answer stacked questions, claim that support is widespread, and attempt to build positive momentum.

10. Blame the media for focusing on the opponents.  Since the legacy media is decidedly pro-Obama, this accusation doesn't provoke their ire. It should, but it doesn't.

11. Demonize the opposition.  This is, perhaps, the most consistent and frequently used tactic designed to weaken the opposition to Obamacare. Rush Limbaugh is accused of inflammatory language, and his alleged minions dutifully march into the contentious town hall meetings that surface on YouTube.

12. Make false claims for Obamacare.  This tactic is close to #5.  It's represents the dissemination of misinformation about the House bill, pertaining to the bill's costs and provisions. This tactic provoked angry pushback at some town hall meetings. People had read the bill, while their congressional member clearly had not.

So what other tactics are yet to be deployed?