Cloward-Piven Crisis Care

The fear of a swine flu pandemic may be a crisis too good  for President Obama to waste in his quest to take over national health care. Chaos is becoming a commodity for an ideologically driven Obama Administration, which appears to depend on crisis to promote policy initiatives.
Barack Obama has shown himself proficient at utilizing negative circumstances as tactical policy initiators and seems to benefit politically by"...discovering opportunity in the midst of great crisis." 

The president's ability to exploit crises is reminiscent of the controversial teachings of Columbia University political scientists, Frances Fox Piven and Richard Andrew Cloward. Inspired by the Obama mentor -- radical community organizer Saul Alinsky -- these two sixties social revolutionaries taught that upheaval is something that should "never be wasted" and that political change can be fostered through "...orchestrated crisis." Two skills Barack Obama proficiently exercises every chance he gets.

Cloward-Piven instructed activists that if a crisis did not exist, promote or manufacture one by exaggerating a benign or unthreatening predicament. In doing so, contrived commotion would serve as a tool to convince the masses of their urgent need for rescue. In order to achieve the ultimate goal, students were encouraged to stress the social system to the breaking point, which would quash capitalism and institute socialism through a massive infusion of government intervention

Cloward-Piven repeatedly cited Alinsky's, Rules for Radicals, in all their work. Marxism advocates were taught by Cloward-Piven to, "Make the enemy live up to their own book of rules." Never failing to remind their apprentices that, "...when pressed...human agencies inevitably fall short...the system's failure to "live up" to its rule book can then is used to discredit it altogether." The definitive goal: "... replace the capitalist "rule book" with a socialist one."

In order to emphasize the urgency of calamity, Obama too has been fostering fear and fueling crisis since day one. He has methodically infiltrated private industry using "crisis" as his access and the government as a controlling entity to rectify problems. Since Inauguration Day, Obama's Cloward-Piven nationalization agenda has systematically advanced as the remedy to every crisis from banking to global warming. The ultimate prize for the social venture the president is promoting would be to nationalize health care.

The present pandemic sized health scare is a made-to-order crisis, which could serve to make palatable to the public an unpopular policy proposal. If Obama can successfully exacerbate apprehension in the public, as he has done in the past, his health care bill can pass on the wings of nationwide alarm. The swine flu epidemic presents him with an excellent opportunity to use crisis as a springboard to replace what he considers a flawed market driven health care system, with a government controlled socialized version. 

In the same way it sought to undermine economic and social issues, the Cloward-Piven strategy functionally applies to the worldwide flu crisis to benefit health care reform. Obama has the power to compel the present system to provide every American with precautionary care. For instance, in anticipation of a global pandemic, "...a seed stock of a vaccine against the swine flu, which could be pushed into production should the number of cases jump significantly." Long lines of American citizens, lined up for hours, waiting to be vaccinated and eager to do whatever is necessary to assure the safety of their children is custom made for an Obama-type policy initiation.

A contagion crisis is a perfect catalyst to convince Americans that, collectively, we all need protection from health-related threats, and that only through equally distributed government intervention can we all be assured defense from a national threat like the deadly swine flu. In the same way, a massive inoculation program would surely stress the system to the breaking point causing a "profound...political crisis" exacerbated by a health care issue, which would "...unleash powerful forces...for major [health care] reform on the national level." Crisis induced nationalization of a major private industry such as health care could finally enthrone an important segment of collectivism, delighting the Cloward-Piven contingency.

The President's exigency rhetoric could easily attach the economy to health care, in the same way he tied the banks to the economic downturn. The connection will provide weight to the threat and impact to his proposal, persuading the public that a health care bill is imperative to save lives and insure international safety on countless levels. If the swine flu grips the country there will be no time for private citizens to focus on policy details, they will be looking for a remedy rescue plan and will sign on to anything.

Ushering through a Barack Obama social engineering coup of the highest order, Congress could hastily draft a bill over a protracted weekend. By the following Monday afternoon Americans will drift, like a sounder of pigs, into the world of socialized medicine. Months after being shuttled into crowded, poorly run clinics, reality will hit the citizenry hard. After recuperating from the shock, Americans will too late realize that the fine print of Obama's crisis health care program includes the hog manure research of European style medicine. 

Without such a well-timed swine flu epidemic, herding Americans toward the sty of the public trough would be much more difficult. Under different circumstances, initiating an endeavor of such a grand magnitude might take years to implement. Nevertheless, an opportune Mexican contribution of swine flu has provided a crisis driven opportunity, which very well may become the fulfillment of the Obama socialized health care dream.

As crisis after crisis arises, Americans need to be aware that the strategy behind Obama's misuse of hardship is an effort to further an ideological socialist schema. The Cloward-Piven star pupil, Barack Obama, is aware that "...all change means disorganization of the old and organization of the new." His frantic mission is to promote national economic and social change through using crisis as a means of disorganization and government as a tool of reorganization. His ultimate goal is to have government absorb the lion share of national industries and services, transforming our democracy into a socialistic state through the systematic exploitation of misfortune and national crisis. 

Jeannie DeAngelis authors a conservative blog at jeannieology.wordpress.com
The fear of a swine flu pandemic may be a crisis too good  for President Obama to waste in his quest to take over national health care. Chaos is becoming a commodity for an ideologically driven Obama Administration, which appears to depend on crisis to promote policy initiatives.
Barack Obama has shown himself proficient at utilizing negative circumstances as tactical policy initiators and seems to benefit politically by"...discovering opportunity in the midst of great crisis." 

The president's ability to exploit crises is reminiscent of the controversial teachings of Columbia University political scientists, Frances Fox Piven and Richard Andrew Cloward. Inspired by the Obama mentor -- radical community organizer Saul Alinsky -- these two sixties social revolutionaries taught that upheaval is something that should "never be wasted" and that political change can be fostered through "...orchestrated crisis." Two skills Barack Obama proficiently exercises every chance he gets.

Cloward-Piven instructed activists that if a crisis did not exist, promote or manufacture one by exaggerating a benign or unthreatening predicament. In doing so, contrived commotion would serve as a tool to convince the masses of their urgent need for rescue. In order to achieve the ultimate goal, students were encouraged to stress the social system to the breaking point, which would quash capitalism and institute socialism through a massive infusion of government intervention

Cloward-Piven repeatedly cited Alinsky's, Rules for Radicals, in all their work. Marxism advocates were taught by Cloward-Piven to, "Make the enemy live up to their own book of rules." Never failing to remind their apprentices that, "...when pressed...human agencies inevitably fall short...the system's failure to "live up" to its rule book can then is used to discredit it altogether." The definitive goal: "... replace the capitalist "rule book" with a socialist one."

In order to emphasize the urgency of calamity, Obama too has been fostering fear and fueling crisis since day one. He has methodically infiltrated private industry using "crisis" as his access and the government as a controlling entity to rectify problems. Since Inauguration Day, Obama's Cloward-Piven nationalization agenda has systematically advanced as the remedy to every crisis from banking to global warming. The ultimate prize for the social venture the president is promoting would be to nationalize health care.

The present pandemic sized health scare is a made-to-order crisis, which could serve to make palatable to the public an unpopular policy proposal. If Obama can successfully exacerbate apprehension in the public, as he has done in the past, his health care bill can pass on the wings of nationwide alarm. The swine flu epidemic presents him with an excellent opportunity to use crisis as a springboard to replace what he considers a flawed market driven health care system, with a government controlled socialized version. 

In the same way it sought to undermine economic and social issues, the Cloward-Piven strategy functionally applies to the worldwide flu crisis to benefit health care reform. Obama has the power to compel the present system to provide every American with precautionary care. For instance, in anticipation of a global pandemic, "...a seed stock of a vaccine against the swine flu, which could be pushed into production should the number of cases jump significantly." Long lines of American citizens, lined up for hours, waiting to be vaccinated and eager to do whatever is necessary to assure the safety of their children is custom made for an Obama-type policy initiation.

A contagion crisis is a perfect catalyst to convince Americans that, collectively, we all need protection from health-related threats, and that only through equally distributed government intervention can we all be assured defense from a national threat like the deadly swine flu. In the same way, a massive inoculation program would surely stress the system to the breaking point causing a "profound...political crisis" exacerbated by a health care issue, which would "...unleash powerful forces...for major [health care] reform on the national level." Crisis induced nationalization of a major private industry such as health care could finally enthrone an important segment of collectivism, delighting the Cloward-Piven contingency.

The President's exigency rhetoric could easily attach the economy to health care, in the same way he tied the banks to the economic downturn. The connection will provide weight to the threat and impact to his proposal, persuading the public that a health care bill is imperative to save lives and insure international safety on countless levels. If the swine flu grips the country there will be no time for private citizens to focus on policy details, they will be looking for a remedy rescue plan and will sign on to anything.

Ushering through a Barack Obama social engineering coup of the highest order, Congress could hastily draft a bill over a protracted weekend. By the following Monday afternoon Americans will drift, like a sounder of pigs, into the world of socialized medicine. Months after being shuttled into crowded, poorly run clinics, reality will hit the citizenry hard. After recuperating from the shock, Americans will too late realize that the fine print of Obama's crisis health care program includes the hog manure research of European style medicine. 

Without such a well-timed swine flu epidemic, herding Americans toward the sty of the public trough would be much more difficult. Under different circumstances, initiating an endeavor of such a grand magnitude might take years to implement. Nevertheless, an opportune Mexican contribution of swine flu has provided a crisis driven opportunity, which very well may become the fulfillment of the Obama socialized health care dream.

As crisis after crisis arises, Americans need to be aware that the strategy behind Obama's misuse of hardship is an effort to further an ideological socialist schema. The Cloward-Piven star pupil, Barack Obama, is aware that "...all change means disorganization of the old and organization of the new." His frantic mission is to promote national economic and social change through using crisis as a means of disorganization and government as a tool of reorganization. His ultimate goal is to have government absorb the lion share of national industries and services, transforming our democracy into a socialistic state through the systematic exploitation of misfortune and national crisis. 

Jeannie DeAngelis authors a conservative blog at jeannieology.wordpress.com