Life in the Russian Underground

Underground, a Memoir by L.D. Anderson

Against a background of raging contentiousness -- with liberals hating conservatives, Muslims hating Jews, and an otherwise endless list of ideologically incompatible segments of society in seemingly constant conflict -- it is refreshing to read a book in which one of the lessons learned is that

"Love and sharing and friendship have it all - over and against any ideology."

For American Thinker readers, it should come as no surprise that we are treated to these words of wisdom by submissions editor and writer, Larrey Anderson.

Underground: Life and Survival in the Russian Black Market, is Larrey's chronicle of his time in the Russian underground assisting seven women in their quest for freedom, while surviving the experience through their love and support. Like his articles for AT, Larrey's account is engaging and honest, warm and inspirational. His writing is exciting, interesting and revealing. The reader remains engaged, excited for the story to unfold, and drawn into his adventure.

While reading Underground, it is easy to forget that it is a true account -- a harrowing tale of survival -- which makes it even more fascinating as the reader learns how these individuals came together, learned to trust and barely survived. An encounter with the KGB is frightening (and I am told, condensed for purposes of the memoir). The relationships are genuine. The laughter is enjoyable. The tears are poignant.

It took Larrey 20 years to fine tune his personal account of his ordeal. He struggled to find the words to express how powerful and compelling an experience he had, and how extraordinary the women who saved him were. He takes us through his quest to find himself, discover the abuses occurring in Russia in the 1980's and save his comrades in arms, the women who entrusted their freedom to an American journalist. In Larrey, they sensed honesty and humanity little found in their world. The reader quickly discovers that that trust was rightfully placed, as Larrey illuminatingly and candidly bares his soul to the reader.

It has been quite some time since I have read a book unrelated to politics. Through Underground, Larrey reminded me what a pleasure it is to read and what an inspiring author he is. Few writers have the talent to share their personal experiences so eloquently and to hold the reader's interest. Larrey accomplishes this and much more.

In Underground, Larrey anecdotally wrote:

"I had made a deal with God, one night when I was twelve or thirteen, that I would someday write great stories for Him to read."

I have no doubt that God is quite enjoying Larrey's wonderful story, as well as his other works. Readers of AT may wish to avail themselves of that pleasure as well.
Underground, a Memoir by L.D. Anderson

Against a background of raging contentiousness -- with liberals hating conservatives, Muslims hating Jews, and an otherwise endless list of ideologically incompatible segments of society in seemingly constant conflict -- it is refreshing to read a book in which one of the lessons learned is that

"Love and sharing and friendship have it all - over and against any ideology."

For American Thinker readers, it should come as no surprise that we are treated to these words of wisdom by submissions editor and writer, Larrey Anderson.

Underground: Life and Survival in the Russian Black Market, is Larrey's chronicle of his time in the Russian underground assisting seven women in their quest for freedom, while surviving the experience through their love and support. Like his articles for AT, Larrey's account is engaging and honest, warm and inspirational. His writing is exciting, interesting and revealing. The reader remains engaged, excited for the story to unfold, and drawn into his adventure.

While reading Underground, it is easy to forget that it is a true account -- a harrowing tale of survival -- which makes it even more fascinating as the reader learns how these individuals came together, learned to trust and barely survived. An encounter with the KGB is frightening (and I am told, condensed for purposes of the memoir). The relationships are genuine. The laughter is enjoyable. The tears are poignant.

It took Larrey 20 years to fine tune his personal account of his ordeal. He struggled to find the words to express how powerful and compelling an experience he had, and how extraordinary the women who saved him were. He takes us through his quest to find himself, discover the abuses occurring in Russia in the 1980's and save his comrades in arms, the women who entrusted their freedom to an American journalist. In Larrey, they sensed honesty and humanity little found in their world. The reader quickly discovers that that trust was rightfully placed, as Larrey illuminatingly and candidly bares his soul to the reader.

It has been quite some time since I have read a book unrelated to politics. Through Underground, Larrey reminded me what a pleasure it is to read and what an inspiring author he is. Few writers have the talent to share their personal experiences so eloquently and to hold the reader's interest. Larrey accomplishes this and much more.

In Underground, Larrey anecdotally wrote:

"I had made a deal with God, one night when I was twelve or thirteen, that I would someday write great stories for Him to read."

I have no doubt that God is quite enjoying Larrey's wonderful story, as well as his other works. Readers of AT may wish to avail themselves of that pleasure as well.