Obama Supporters: Now That It's Over...

To the supporters of President-Elect Barack Obama, heartiest congratulations.  This is a big moment for you and for this nation.  You have worked hard and your efforts have been rewarded, your hopes fulfilled and your dreams revived.  That is, indeed, a wonderful feeling, and one every human being ought to experience at least once in life.

On behalf of those who supported the other ticket, for whatever reasons -- and none of them matter now -- I'd like to propose an accord.  Let us move toward each other with open minds, open hearts and belief in our collective future.  Let this be the election that, despite the rhetoric of the campaign season, inspires every American to be his or her best citizen.  We sought Change, so let us change the things that divide us as a nation. 

First, let us remove our bumper stickers and lawn signs.  The election is over.  This is a new day.  Reminders of the campaign season serve only to nurture resentments and hurt. Senator McCain's concession speech was humble, eloquent and inspiring.  Surely his supporters can agree to follow his lead.

To those whose candidate won, please be gracious.  To those who supported the other ticket, let us be good sports, remembering that both conservatives and liberals are essential to the cultural and governmental balance that has sustained the United States and made us the most envied nation the world has ever seen. 

Let us return to good manners.  The vitriol of the 2008 contests was shocking, demeaning and unworthy of a people who have so much.   Let us all speak as if our grandparents were listening.  Please, no more name-calling, no more character assassinations.  Deep in our hearts, we all know that most candidates for public service, no matter their party affiliation, intend their best.  There is room within the American dialogue for virtually every perspective on every issue.  Open discourse fosters growth and development, knowledge and understanding. 

Let us look to our children in matters of race.  Young Americans are colorblind.  Their acceptance of and interest in each other evidences the kind of social evolution we can all be proud of.  They are the blessed reward for the civil rights struggles of the 20th century.  Let us ease away from the concept of "minority".  The complexion of this nation is evolving toward a human race.  Let us hold that concept in our hearts and value each life as equal in import to our own.

Let us hear each other, consider alternative views, and measure our words.  Let us respect each other, always.  Let us shrug off minor misunderstandings and perceived insults and insist upon the same from our elected leaders.  Today brings a fresh start, a new beginning, and an opportunity for us to appreciate each other as we did in the aftermath of September 11.   America is for all of us.  There is plenty here for everyone, yet we are not so rich that we can afford to ignore even the smallest of voices, liberal or conservative, young or old, urban or rural, black, brown, white or other.

Let us help each other when and where we can.  If we have gifts, let us share them freely.  If we have needs, let us express them responsibly and appropriately.  Where we see despair, let us offer our hands and hope.  Where there was discord and suspicion, let us celebrate our differences, expect the best and do our share.  One small contribution, every day, multiplied by each of us is an awesome force for the change we seek.

Let us stop blaming President Bush.  Whatever his shortcomings - and we will never agree as to their dimensions - let us understand that he has kept us safe from those who seek to destroy us.  Let us respect and appreciate him for his service to this nation in a time of global upheaval. Criticizing him with the most vicious language has become a national pastime and it is not fair, not honorable and not legitimate.  We do not have to agree with him to acknowledge his dedication to our well-being.  We cannot look to the future while grumbling about the past.

Let us take a collective deep breath, turn toward the future and work together to repair the soul and spirit of the greatest nation in the history of the world.  Agreed?
To the supporters of President-Elect Barack Obama, heartiest congratulations.  This is a big moment for you and for this nation.  You have worked hard and your efforts have been rewarded, your hopes fulfilled and your dreams revived.  That is, indeed, a wonderful feeling, and one every human being ought to experience at least once in life.

On behalf of those who supported the other ticket, for whatever reasons -- and none of them matter now -- I'd like to propose an accord.  Let us move toward each other with open minds, open hearts and belief in our collective future.  Let this be the election that, despite the rhetoric of the campaign season, inspires every American to be his or her best citizen.  We sought Change, so let us change the things that divide us as a nation. 

First, let us remove our bumper stickers and lawn signs.  The election is over.  This is a new day.  Reminders of the campaign season serve only to nurture resentments and hurt. Senator McCain's concession speech was humble, eloquent and inspiring.  Surely his supporters can agree to follow his lead.

To those whose candidate won, please be gracious.  To those who supported the other ticket, let us be good sports, remembering that both conservatives and liberals are essential to the cultural and governmental balance that has sustained the United States and made us the most envied nation the world has ever seen. 

Let us return to good manners.  The vitriol of the 2008 contests was shocking, demeaning and unworthy of a people who have so much.   Let us all speak as if our grandparents were listening.  Please, no more name-calling, no more character assassinations.  Deep in our hearts, we all know that most candidates for public service, no matter their party affiliation, intend their best.  There is room within the American dialogue for virtually every perspective on every issue.  Open discourse fosters growth and development, knowledge and understanding. 

Let us look to our children in matters of race.  Young Americans are colorblind.  Their acceptance of and interest in each other evidences the kind of social evolution we can all be proud of.  They are the blessed reward for the civil rights struggles of the 20th century.  Let us ease away from the concept of "minority".  The complexion of this nation is evolving toward a human race.  Let us hold that concept in our hearts and value each life as equal in import to our own.

Let us hear each other, consider alternative views, and measure our words.  Let us respect each other, always.  Let us shrug off minor misunderstandings and perceived insults and insist upon the same from our elected leaders.  Today brings a fresh start, a new beginning, and an opportunity for us to appreciate each other as we did in the aftermath of September 11.   America is for all of us.  There is plenty here for everyone, yet we are not so rich that we can afford to ignore even the smallest of voices, liberal or conservative, young or old, urban or rural, black, brown, white or other.

Let us help each other when and where we can.  If we have gifts, let us share them freely.  If we have needs, let us express them responsibly and appropriately.  Where we see despair, let us offer our hands and hope.  Where there was discord and suspicion, let us celebrate our differences, expect the best and do our share.  One small contribution, every day, multiplied by each of us is an awesome force for the change we seek.

Let us stop blaming President Bush.  Whatever his shortcomings - and we will never agree as to their dimensions - let us understand that he has kept us safe from those who seek to destroy us.  Let us respect and appreciate him for his service to this nation in a time of global upheaval. Criticizing him with the most vicious language has become a national pastime and it is not fair, not honorable and not legitimate.  We do not have to agree with him to acknowledge his dedication to our well-being.  We cannot look to the future while grumbling about the past.

Let us take a collective deep breath, turn toward the future and work together to repair the soul and spirit of the greatest nation in the history of the world.  Agreed?