Wealthier than Kings

Royalty lived well through command of menial labor. But the role of labor has changed. A typical American child, my eight-year old daughter, is already proficient with panoply of technologies and gadgets that provide her capabilities and resources that make her, in many ways, far wealthier than the mightiest kings of yore. Elizabeth II, Queen of England, has access herself to today's technologies, so let's consider the cornucopia of personal devices and services that have emerged since her coronation.

The Queen's predecessor and father, George VI 
reigned from 1936 until his death in 1952, having been thrust unexpectedly upon the throne late in life after the surprise abdication of his brother, Edward VIII.  As boys and young men, both were royal princes of the realm, in line of succession at the zenith of the British Empire.  In consequence, they had access to servants and palaces, fellowship of the greatest noblemen, and resources of the Imperial Government, British Army and Royal Navy, all by virtue of being at the ruling apex both political and social of the greatest Colonial Empire in history in its most modern epoch before the onset of its decline after WWII. Nonetheless, compared to these greatest of princes and kings, my daughter has at her fingertips miraculous but inexpensive technologies undreamed of 50 years ago. Unlike Kings Edward and George,

  1. She can communicate instantaneously with her mother from almost anywhere at any time
  2. She can capture in an instant a high-resolution color-photo ready for digital editing
  3. She can send said photo to her grandmother 1000 miles away in the blink of an eye
  4. She can game online with a playmate on the other side of the globe
  5. Her father can map her GPS position and be given travel directions automatically
  6. Her family is routinely forewarned well in advance of severe storms by weather satellites
  7. She can board a plane and travel quickly and economically to almost any major city in the world in the certain expectation of complete safety, comfort and timeliness
  8. She can purchase a gift from innumerable online-emporiums to be sent overnight to nearly any address in North America
  9. She travels freely, safely, comfortably and at high speed the economical family car any time we wish to destinations both local and long-distance on an extensive, continent-spanning network of well-maintained roads and interstate highways
  10. Her parents can access and transmit funds in an instant almost anywhere in the world without fear of theft, misdirection or delay
  11. She routinely views educational video clips taken from outer space or deep undersea
  12. She lives at a time of unprecedented excellence in public health
  13. She has ready access to health care infrastructure that is amazingly proficient and effective, resulting in America's ever increasing quality-of-life and life expectancy
  14. Her home and school are powered by electricity from the nearby nuclear generator.

Each capability a commonplace in the 21st Century even for our children, they are hardly remarkable -- except that they are!  Kings Edward and George would have been stunned and pleased by anyone of them.  Americans too often take for granted our ever increasing wealth in technologies developed and furnished by American corporations (with an occasional assist from capitalists in Japan, South Korea and Europe). This ingratitude is understandable, because with the help of their anti-American cohorts in the media and entertainment establishment, Democrats constantly vilify consumers and demonize our consumer-driven corporate sector.

Deferential attendance by menial servants marks royalty. Indeed, management of servants becomes a preoccupation of aristocrats -- at times requiring considerable thought and attention. Yet routine assertions of will by superiors over their social inferiors can corrode the humanity of all.   Raised in egalitarian America, my daughter has instead ready access to superior, nearly automatic resources and services without need for servile human intervention. All these services are voluntarily offered by fellow Americans who choose to participate as our social equals in the free market:

  1. Internet search engines are much faster and have access to a vastly greater data base than even a royal army of file clerks and librarians
  2. Word processing has become so easy we tend to forget that production and reproduction of letters and documents quite recently required offices and workshops filled with typists, stenographers, typesetters and printers
  3. Software and online-banking maintain financial accounts up-to-date and with unprecedented accuracy, all without bookkeepers and accountants
  4. Local supermarkets provide a constant supply of fresh, inexpensive groceries and other goods with abundant choices at low prices without stewards, butlers or game-keepers
  5. The entire entertainment industry backed by enormous budgets compete to entertain her be sending movies, TV shows, and music into our living room, vastly in excess of what could be rendered by court jesters, dancers, musicians, minstrels and bards.
  6. Modern kitchens are equipped for easy preparation of meals without constant need for live-in cooks, waiters, and maids.

The list could go on of course, but the American free-market economy's long-proven ability to innovate automated, labor-saving production, transportation and distribution methods as well as home- and personal-appliances deployed to reduce and eliminate the need for drudge labor -- innovation that is accelerating with the current Age of Silicon's truly miraculous technologies -- has freed vast numbers of Americans from mind-numbing, low-status, poorly-compensated, unskilled employment, and yet yields an ever higher standard-of-living for all Americans without need for a subservient servant class.  This living-standard exceeds that achieved by the British Royals of just a generation ago. 

While some may be impressed with superficial accouterments of royalty such state ceremonies, titles, parades, military reviews, crown jewels, colorful uniforms, horse-drawn coaches, etc., I am much happier that my daughter is not an aristocrat.  She can look forward to growing up in America where her individual exertion and character, personal and professional interactions, and educational, career and family accomplishments will alone distinguish her life, allowing her to bolster her already-strong and well-earned sense of happiness and self-worth.  She has access to ever superior technological and economic resources in a society with ever increasing realms of opportunity without any need to ever deem anyone else to be a social inferior; these American-made resources and her American values magnify her life, health, education, well-being, skills, creativity, and abilities.

Despite this long history of market-born Yankee ingenuity that enhances the living standards of all, providing unprecedented economic gains and social-mobility, liberals constantly seek to deride Americans and divide us into classes.  Illogically liberals also compare Americans unfavorably to Europeans - many of whom are not citizens but royal subjects in a continent still quite steeped in true class divisions, social inequalities and aristocratic titles.  Liberals' transparent motive is to foment political unrest among the less astute with the hope that such dissension will propel their ascent to power.

Democrats obsess over class distinctions.  This betrays a psychological need to consign others to second-class status in attempts to assign themselves the role of America's hereditary nobles - condescending to attend to the wants of their commoner-constituents while on campaign to recapture Camelot-on-Potomac.

But while most Americans consider today's true Royals to be a species of celebrity whose lives and antics are, at times, worthy of attention and gossip, we would never look to them for governance. We place our faith in self-made men and women of accomplishment.

As a child my daughter is bedazzled with the latest games and toys, but she will grow to love the more enduring values of being a patriotic American, grateful for every benefit conferred by our forefathers. So the next time the Democrats complain that America is in crisis, that we are on the precipice of another Great Depression, that our health-care system is broken, that the middle class is being impoverished, and that capitalism fails us constantly, recognize their folly as well as their ulterior motives.  Be proud and content in the knowledge that American enterprise has propelled our children to become wealthier than kings.
Royalty lived well through command of menial labor. But the role of labor has changed. A typical American child, my eight-year old daughter, is already proficient with panoply of technologies and gadgets that provide her capabilities and resources that make her, in many ways, far wealthier than the mightiest kings of yore. Elizabeth II, Queen of England, has access herself to today's technologies, so let's consider the cornucopia of personal devices and services that have emerged since her coronation.

The Queen's predecessor and father, George VI 
reigned from 1936 until his death in 1952, having been thrust unexpectedly upon the throne late in life after the surprise abdication of his brother, Edward VIII.  As boys and young men, both were royal princes of the realm, in line of succession at the zenith of the British Empire.  In consequence, they had access to servants and palaces, fellowship of the greatest noblemen, and resources of the Imperial Government, British Army and Royal Navy, all by virtue of being at the ruling apex both political and social of the greatest Colonial Empire in history in its most modern epoch before the onset of its decline after WWII. Nonetheless, compared to these greatest of princes and kings, my daughter has at her fingertips miraculous but inexpensive technologies undreamed of 50 years ago. Unlike Kings Edward and George,

  1. She can communicate instantaneously with her mother from almost anywhere at any time
  2. She can capture in an instant a high-resolution color-photo ready for digital editing
  3. She can send said photo to her grandmother 1000 miles away in the blink of an eye
  4. She can game online with a playmate on the other side of the globe
  5. Her father can map her GPS position and be given travel directions automatically
  6. Her family is routinely forewarned well in advance of severe storms by weather satellites
  7. She can board a plane and travel quickly and economically to almost any major city in the world in the certain expectation of complete safety, comfort and timeliness
  8. She can purchase a gift from innumerable online-emporiums to be sent overnight to nearly any address in North America
  9. She travels freely, safely, comfortably and at high speed the economical family car any time we wish to destinations both local and long-distance on an extensive, continent-spanning network of well-maintained roads and interstate highways
  10. Her parents can access and transmit funds in an instant almost anywhere in the world without fear of theft, misdirection or delay
  11. She routinely views educational video clips taken from outer space or deep undersea
  12. She lives at a time of unprecedented excellence in public health
  13. She has ready access to health care infrastructure that is amazingly proficient and effective, resulting in America's ever increasing quality-of-life and life expectancy
  14. Her home and school are powered by electricity from the nearby nuclear generator.

Each capability a commonplace in the 21st Century even for our children, they are hardly remarkable -- except that they are!  Kings Edward and George would have been stunned and pleased by anyone of them.  Americans too often take for granted our ever increasing wealth in technologies developed and furnished by American corporations (with an occasional assist from capitalists in Japan, South Korea and Europe). This ingratitude is understandable, because with the help of their anti-American cohorts in the media and entertainment establishment, Democrats constantly vilify consumers and demonize our consumer-driven corporate sector.

Deferential attendance by menial servants marks royalty. Indeed, management of servants becomes a preoccupation of aristocrats -- at times requiring considerable thought and attention. Yet routine assertions of will by superiors over their social inferiors can corrode the humanity of all.   Raised in egalitarian America, my daughter has instead ready access to superior, nearly automatic resources and services without need for servile human intervention. All these services are voluntarily offered by fellow Americans who choose to participate as our social equals in the free market:

  1. Internet search engines are much faster and have access to a vastly greater data base than even a royal army of file clerks and librarians
  2. Word processing has become so easy we tend to forget that production and reproduction of letters and documents quite recently required offices and workshops filled with typists, stenographers, typesetters and printers
  3. Software and online-banking maintain financial accounts up-to-date and with unprecedented accuracy, all without bookkeepers and accountants
  4. Local supermarkets provide a constant supply of fresh, inexpensive groceries and other goods with abundant choices at low prices without stewards, butlers or game-keepers
  5. The entire entertainment industry backed by enormous budgets compete to entertain her be sending movies, TV shows, and music into our living room, vastly in excess of what could be rendered by court jesters, dancers, musicians, minstrels and bards.
  6. Modern kitchens are equipped for easy preparation of meals without constant need for live-in cooks, waiters, and maids.

The list could go on of course, but the American free-market economy's long-proven ability to innovate automated, labor-saving production, transportation and distribution methods as well as home- and personal-appliances deployed to reduce and eliminate the need for drudge labor -- innovation that is accelerating with the current Age of Silicon's truly miraculous technologies -- has freed vast numbers of Americans from mind-numbing, low-status, poorly-compensated, unskilled employment, and yet yields an ever higher standard-of-living for all Americans without need for a subservient servant class.  This living-standard exceeds that achieved by the British Royals of just a generation ago. 

While some may be impressed with superficial accouterments of royalty such state ceremonies, titles, parades, military reviews, crown jewels, colorful uniforms, horse-drawn coaches, etc., I am much happier that my daughter is not an aristocrat.  She can look forward to growing up in America where her individual exertion and character, personal and professional interactions, and educational, career and family accomplishments will alone distinguish her life, allowing her to bolster her already-strong and well-earned sense of happiness and self-worth.  She has access to ever superior technological and economic resources in a society with ever increasing realms of opportunity without any need to ever deem anyone else to be a social inferior; these American-made resources and her American values magnify her life, health, education, well-being, skills, creativity, and abilities.

Despite this long history of market-born Yankee ingenuity that enhances the living standards of all, providing unprecedented economic gains and social-mobility, liberals constantly seek to deride Americans and divide us into classes.  Illogically liberals also compare Americans unfavorably to Europeans - many of whom are not citizens but royal subjects in a continent still quite steeped in true class divisions, social inequalities and aristocratic titles.  Liberals' transparent motive is to foment political unrest among the less astute with the hope that such dissension will propel their ascent to power.

Democrats obsess over class distinctions.  This betrays a psychological need to consign others to second-class status in attempts to assign themselves the role of America's hereditary nobles - condescending to attend to the wants of their commoner-constituents while on campaign to recapture Camelot-on-Potomac.

But while most Americans consider today's true Royals to be a species of celebrity whose lives and antics are, at times, worthy of attention and gossip, we would never look to them for governance. We place our faith in self-made men and women of accomplishment.

As a child my daughter is bedazzled with the latest games and toys, but she will grow to love the more enduring values of being a patriotic American, grateful for every benefit conferred by our forefathers. So the next time the Democrats complain that America is in crisis, that we are on the precipice of another Great Depression, that our health-care system is broken, that the middle class is being impoverished, and that capitalism fails us constantly, recognize their folly as well as their ulterior motives.  Be proud and content in the knowledge that American enterprise has propelled our children to become wealthier than kings.