Never Forget Our Heroes

The one thing that America must never, ever do is stop teaching the rich military heritage of our nation, going back to the 1700's, decades before the Revolutionary War. Many schools, led by liberal teachers and administrators, refuse to teach military history lest someone actually grow up to want to serve their nation and those who live in it.

As a retired Marine now serving in a civilian status in Iraq, I sometimes think about one of my personal heroes (among many of America's heroes), who must  never be forgotten. The sacrifice of our military forces has given us our freedoms, and once we stop remembering them, we'll die as a nation.

Thus, as we approach my hero's birthday, and indeed, the Marine Corps' Birthday on 10 November, let us remember a double award winner of America's highest award, the Medal of Honor.


Dan DalyDan Daly was born in Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, on 11 November 1873, and aside from the fact that he was a newsboy and something of a fighter for his weight and size, not much else is known about his pre-Marine Corps days. But he joined the Corps, who made him into a legend.

The Marines were taking a pounding from German artillery and small-arms fire in June 1918, at Belleau Wood. They were outnumbered, outgunned, and pinned down by fire that literally scythed down the ripening wheat stalks around them. GySgt Dan Daly then entered the annals of American military history when he jumped and bellowed, "Come on, you sons of b*tches, do you want to live forever?" The tired Marines took Belleau Wood so fiercely that the Germans who survived the attack referred to the Marines as "Teuful Hunden, or Devil Dogs." But Gunny Daly DID NOT get the Medal of Honor for this action, he won both of his awards in 1900 and 1915!

Award number one

In May 1900, he shipped aboard the USS Newark for Taku Bay, China, where he landed with other Marines and entrained for Peking. The American Marines and Germans had been stationed on Tartar Wall, south of the American Legation, but intense enemy fire had driven them from the position. With Captain Hall, PFC Daly mounted the wall bastion, bayoneted rifle in hand. On August 14, Captain Hall left to bring up reinforcements and Daly remained to defend the position single-handed. Chinese snipers fired at him and stormed the bastion, but he fought them off until reinforcements arrived.

Award number two

Gunnery Sergeant Daniel Daly, United States Marine Corps, on the night of October 24, 1915, three officers and 35 enlisted men were attacked by 400 Cacos while crossing a river in a deep ravine concealed in bushes about 100 yards from a fort. The Marine detachment fought its way forward to a good position which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a continuous fire from the Cacos. While fording a river, the rebels opened fire. All the Marines made it to the bank safely, however, the horse carrying the machine gun was killed and abandoned in mid river, along with many others. During the night, the embattled Marines were again attacked and the patrol leader called for the machine gun. Daly immediately volunteered to return to the river and retrieve the weapon. Making his way back to the river through enemy patrols, he found the dead horse, cut the gun from it, and strapping it to his back returned to the Marine Position.

A complete list of Sergeant Major Daniel Daly's decorations and medals includes: the Medal of Honor (Navy) (1900-Peking, China); Medal of Honor (Navy) (1915-Haiti); Navy Cross (1918-Belleau Woods); Distinguished Service Cross; Letter of Commendation (Secretary of the Navy); Letter of Commendation (Secretary of the Navy); Letter of Commendation; Good Conduct Medal with two bronze stars; China Relief Expedition Medal; Philippine Campaign Medal; Expeditionary Medal with one bronze star; Mexican Service Medal; Haitian Campaign Medal; World War I Victory Medal with Aisne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne and Defensive-Sector clasps; Medaille Militaire; Croix de Guerre with Palm; and the Fourragere.

American lost a hero on April 28, 1937 Daly (65) died at Glenade L.I, New York.

Sergeant Major Daniel "Dan" Daly, USMC, (ret), ONE Tough Devil Dog!
The one thing that America must never, ever do is stop teaching the rich military heritage of our nation, going back to the 1700's, decades before the Revolutionary War. Many schools, led by liberal teachers and administrators, refuse to teach military history lest someone actually grow up to want to serve their nation and those who live in it.

As a retired Marine now serving in a civilian status in Iraq, I sometimes think about one of my personal heroes (among many of America's heroes), who must  never be forgotten. The sacrifice of our military forces has given us our freedoms, and once we stop remembering them, we'll die as a nation.

Thus, as we approach my hero's birthday, and indeed, the Marine Corps' Birthday on 10 November, let us remember a double award winner of America's highest award, the Medal of Honor.


Dan DalyDan Daly was born in Glen Cove, Long Island, New York, on 11 November 1873, and aside from the fact that he was a newsboy and something of a fighter for his weight and size, not much else is known about his pre-Marine Corps days. But he joined the Corps, who made him into a legend.

The Marines were taking a pounding from German artillery and small-arms fire in June 1918, at Belleau Wood. They were outnumbered, outgunned, and pinned down by fire that literally scythed down the ripening wheat stalks around them. GySgt Dan Daly then entered the annals of American military history when he jumped and bellowed, "Come on, you sons of b*tches, do you want to live forever?" The tired Marines took Belleau Wood so fiercely that the Germans who survived the attack referred to the Marines as "Teuful Hunden, or Devil Dogs." But Gunny Daly DID NOT get the Medal of Honor for this action, he won both of his awards in 1900 and 1915!

Award number one

In May 1900, he shipped aboard the USS Newark for Taku Bay, China, where he landed with other Marines and entrained for Peking. The American Marines and Germans had been stationed on Tartar Wall, south of the American Legation, but intense enemy fire had driven them from the position. With Captain Hall, PFC Daly mounted the wall bastion, bayoneted rifle in hand. On August 14, Captain Hall left to bring up reinforcements and Daly remained to defend the position single-handed. Chinese snipers fired at him and stormed the bastion, but he fought them off until reinforcements arrived.

Award number two

Gunnery Sergeant Daniel Daly, United States Marine Corps, on the night of October 24, 1915, three officers and 35 enlisted men were attacked by 400 Cacos while crossing a river in a deep ravine concealed in bushes about 100 yards from a fort. The Marine detachment fought its way forward to a good position which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a continuous fire from the Cacos. While fording a river, the rebels opened fire. All the Marines made it to the bank safely, however, the horse carrying the machine gun was killed and abandoned in mid river, along with many others. During the night, the embattled Marines were again attacked and the patrol leader called for the machine gun. Daly immediately volunteered to return to the river and retrieve the weapon. Making his way back to the river through enemy patrols, he found the dead horse, cut the gun from it, and strapping it to his back returned to the Marine Position.

A complete list of Sergeant Major Daniel Daly's decorations and medals includes: the Medal of Honor (Navy) (1900-Peking, China); Medal of Honor (Navy) (1915-Haiti); Navy Cross (1918-Belleau Woods); Distinguished Service Cross; Letter of Commendation (Secretary of the Navy); Letter of Commendation (Secretary of the Navy); Letter of Commendation; Good Conduct Medal with two bronze stars; China Relief Expedition Medal; Philippine Campaign Medal; Expeditionary Medal with one bronze star; Mexican Service Medal; Haitian Campaign Medal; World War I Victory Medal with Aisne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne and Defensive-Sector clasps; Medaille Militaire; Croix de Guerre with Palm; and the Fourragere.

American lost a hero on April 28, 1937 Daly (65) died at Glenade L.I, New York.

Sergeant Major Daniel "Dan" Daly, USMC, (ret), ONE Tough Devil Dog!