The Clark Doctrine

General Wesley Clark waded into the controversy involving Rush Limbaugh with a now-notorious appearance on Tucker Carlson's show on MSNBC last week. Carlson and Clark had a feisty exchange, and the General actually advocated the jaw-dropping notion of the government rating political discourse.

Missed in all the hubbub over the government speech-rating proposal was an  enticing implicit poltical deal, something one might call the "Clark Doctrine."

The good General summarized  his battle plan:
"There‘s no reason for the American taxpayer to pay for Rush to assault the character of men and women who serve in the armed forces for their political views."
Apparently, the General wants Limbaugh's show dropped from being broadcast over Armed Forces Radio and Rush dropped into a live volcano. That last part may not be an accurate transcription of the conversation as things got heated between Tucker and our soldier-scholar.

Granted, the Reagan and Truman Doctrines had more substance to them, but this, one must admit, has interesting possibilities.

If the good General wants no taxpayer money used by people (I assume not just Rush) to "assault the character of the men and women who serve in the armed forces", then one must presume we may apply this doctrine to American academia, our valued public institutions of higher learning.

If citizens employed in our public colleges -- and compensated with public dollars for their work -- are discovered to have "assaulted the character" of our military, may tax money be pulled from  them as well?

No fooling?

Hmm, I'm liking this doctrine General. You get Rush, we get to empty out about 40% of the faculty lounges across the country.

It's a deal.

Heck, Rush might even go for it too.
General Wesley Clark waded into the controversy involving Rush Limbaugh with a now-notorious appearance on Tucker Carlson's show on MSNBC last week. Carlson and Clark had a feisty exchange, and the General actually advocated the jaw-dropping notion of the government rating political discourse.

Missed in all the hubbub over the government speech-rating proposal was an  enticing implicit poltical deal, something one might call the "Clark Doctrine."

The good General summarized  his battle plan:
"There‘s no reason for the American taxpayer to pay for Rush to assault the character of men and women who serve in the armed forces for their political views."
Apparently, the General wants Limbaugh's show dropped from being broadcast over Armed Forces Radio and Rush dropped into a live volcano. That last part may not be an accurate transcription of the conversation as things got heated between Tucker and our soldier-scholar.

Granted, the Reagan and Truman Doctrines had more substance to them, but this, one must admit, has interesting possibilities.

If the good General wants no taxpayer money used by people (I assume not just Rush) to "assault the character of the men and women who serve in the armed forces", then one must presume we may apply this doctrine to American academia, our valued public institutions of higher learning.

If citizens employed in our public colleges -- and compensated with public dollars for their work -- are discovered to have "assaulted the character" of our military, may tax money be pulled from  them as well?

No fooling?

Hmm, I'm liking this doctrine General. You get Rush, we get to empty out about 40% of the faculty lounges across the country.

It's a deal.

Heck, Rush might even go for it too.