Whither Bolton?

John Bolton, America's best Ambassador to the UN in our generation, will be leaving his post in the next few weeks. In the wake of a Democratic victory in the midterms that would have left his possible confirmation problematic, he precluded another humiliating rejection.

Many pundits have speculated about his possible replacement. Nicholas Burns (Under Secretary for Political Affairs in the State Department), Congressman Jim Leach, and Senator Mike DeWine are some of the names bandied about.

But few have considered the future of John Bolton himself.

He is a smart, principled man of many accomplishments. He is a very forthright defender of American interests. Indeed, his high level of patriotism may have been one of the marks such media outlets as the New York Times held against him, since America's UN ambassador, in their view, was supposed to be an "internationalist."

Bolton is indefatigable in his labors; his accomplishment in single-handedly rounding up enough votes among nations in the UN General Assembly to overturn the infamous "Zionism is Racism" Resolution is the stuff of legend. His leadership in developing and enforcing the Proliferation Security Initiative has been largely unheralded by a media obsessed with criticizing him. Yet this Initiative has been a key part in helping to ensure that material involved in developing weapons of mass destruction can be interdicted before it falls into the hands of suspect nations or dangerous terror groups.

The PSI is a program that relies on the cooperation of many nations and actors around the world and its success has been a signal accomplishment worthy of high praise. It was this very program that helped to discover nuclear technology being shipped to Libya that led to the unraveling of the nuclear bazaar controlled by Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan. So much for criticism that Bolton was unable to work well with other members of the international community.

Since he has carved out a reputation as an expert in defending our nation and working with others to help ensure world security, one possible position comes to mind as suitable for a man of his talents.

Going to work for Rudy Giuliani.

After leading his city to recovery in the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks, Giuliani capitalized on his reputation as a renowned former federal prosecutor and one of New York's most effective mayors (recall Giuliani's introduction of the "broken windows" as an operating principle in New York City law enforcement; a program of zero tolerance for law-breaking that dramatically helped reduce crime in New York City). He started Giuliani Partners. This is a consulting firm focused on security. The firm attempts to help clients defend themselves from crime, security threats, and terror attacks.

This is, in our times, a growth market. While the firm has had some dealings that are problematical, Rudy himself has maintained a solid reputation and is reportedly considering a run for the Presidency. His own security credentials will be an important asset, should he run, and so would an alliance with John Bolton.

While Bolton may have been the recipient of some flak (something Rudy is familiar with), he has also received praise from non-Americans, sometimes sotto voce, for his ability to work with others on an international stage. The partnering with Bolton would be of immense help in Giuliani Partners international outreach and provide high-level access to decision-makers around the world. Bolton has experience running large departments; should Rudy decide to run for the roses in 2008, Bolton would be ideally placed to assume command at the firm.

In the immediate future, Bolton could help Giuliani Partners in the international realm. Bolton's record of accomplishments in the security field will enhance the reputation of Giuliani Partners and will generate clients. Since the firm is headquartered in New York City, Bolton would not even have to move from the city if he assumed a prominent role in the firm.

My guess is that if Rudy runs, he will leave his firm for a few months or a year, so Bolton could just jump right with him to the campaign. Should Giuliani run, Bolton could help educate and advise Rudy on current matters of international affairs and diplomacy.

Bolton's patriotism, his skeptical attitude towards the United Nations and other international organizations, and his efforts on the security front, all play well with those Republicans on the redder edge of the political spectrum. This is a group that may otherwise have qualms about a Rudy Giuliani run for the White House (Rudy is divorced and has a somewhat tumultuous personal history and is pro-choice).

Bolton, because of his forthright attitude towards the United Nations' bias against Israel, also has a solid reputation among Israel supporter, both Jewish and among the evangelical right. Both are important groups that merit outreach during campaigns for national office.

While a business alliance with John Bolton may not provide political "cover" for Giuliani or cleanse him of the "blemishes" that give some pause, he could do far worse than partnering up with a man who is a hero among these Republicans.


An idea whose time has now come?

Ed Lasky is News Editor of American Thinker.
John Bolton, America's best Ambassador to the UN in our generation, will be leaving his post in the next few weeks. In the wake of a Democratic victory in the midterms that would have left his possible confirmation problematic, he precluded another humiliating rejection.

Many pundits have speculated about his possible replacement. Nicholas Burns (Under Secretary for Political Affairs in the State Department), Congressman Jim Leach, and Senator Mike DeWine are some of the names bandied about.

But few have considered the future of John Bolton himself.

He is a smart, principled man of many accomplishments. He is a very forthright defender of American interests. Indeed, his high level of patriotism may have been one of the marks such media outlets as the New York Times held against him, since America's UN ambassador, in their view, was supposed to be an "internationalist."

Bolton is indefatigable in his labors; his accomplishment in single-handedly rounding up enough votes among nations in the UN General Assembly to overturn the infamous "Zionism is Racism" Resolution is the stuff of legend. His leadership in developing and enforcing the Proliferation Security Initiative has been largely unheralded by a media obsessed with criticizing him. Yet this Initiative has been a key part in helping to ensure that material involved in developing weapons of mass destruction can be interdicted before it falls into the hands of suspect nations or dangerous terror groups.

The PSI is a program that relies on the cooperation of many nations and actors around the world and its success has been a signal accomplishment worthy of high praise. It was this very program that helped to discover nuclear technology being shipped to Libya that led to the unraveling of the nuclear bazaar controlled by Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan. So much for criticism that Bolton was unable to work well with other members of the international community.

Since he has carved out a reputation as an expert in defending our nation and working with others to help ensure world security, one possible position comes to mind as suitable for a man of his talents.

Going to work for Rudy Giuliani.

After leading his city to recovery in the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks, Giuliani capitalized on his reputation as a renowned former federal prosecutor and one of New York's most effective mayors (recall Giuliani's introduction of the "broken windows" as an operating principle in New York City law enforcement; a program of zero tolerance for law-breaking that dramatically helped reduce crime in New York City). He started Giuliani Partners. This is a consulting firm focused on security. The firm attempts to help clients defend themselves from crime, security threats, and terror attacks.

This is, in our times, a growth market. While the firm has had some dealings that are problematical, Rudy himself has maintained a solid reputation and is reportedly considering a run for the Presidency. His own security credentials will be an important asset, should he run, and so would an alliance with John Bolton.

While Bolton may have been the recipient of some flak (something Rudy is familiar with), he has also received praise from non-Americans, sometimes sotto voce, for his ability to work with others on an international stage. The partnering with Bolton would be of immense help in Giuliani Partners international outreach and provide high-level access to decision-makers around the world. Bolton has experience running large departments; should Rudy decide to run for the roses in 2008, Bolton would be ideally placed to assume command at the firm.

In the immediate future, Bolton could help Giuliani Partners in the international realm. Bolton's record of accomplishments in the security field will enhance the reputation of Giuliani Partners and will generate clients. Since the firm is headquartered in New York City, Bolton would not even have to move from the city if he assumed a prominent role in the firm.

My guess is that if Rudy runs, he will leave his firm for a few months or a year, so Bolton could just jump right with him to the campaign. Should Giuliani run, Bolton could help educate and advise Rudy on current matters of international affairs and diplomacy.

Bolton's patriotism, his skeptical attitude towards the United Nations and other international organizations, and his efforts on the security front, all play well with those Republicans on the redder edge of the political spectrum. This is a group that may otherwise have qualms about a Rudy Giuliani run for the White House (Rudy is divorced and has a somewhat tumultuous personal history and is pro-choice).

Bolton, because of his forthright attitude towards the United Nations' bias against Israel, also has a solid reputation among Israel supporter, both Jewish and among the evangelical right. Both are important groups that merit outreach during campaigns for national office.

While a business alliance with John Bolton may not provide political "cover" for Giuliani or cleanse him of the "blemishes" that give some pause, he could do far worse than partnering up with a man who is a hero among these Republicans.


An idea whose time has now come?

Ed Lasky is News Editor of American Thinker.