The Pieta Pose

Today's print edition front—page of the New York Times (visible here) features a large heart—rending photo, above—the—fold, by Tyler Hicks. A visibly grieving female Arab mourner is being being consoled by another woman. Out of curiosity, I researched other photos of his from the NYT archive, and discovered that Mr. Tyler Hicks certainly does have an eye for Arab suffering.

Check out this Tyler Hicks work for the New York Times.

Does it seem just a bit odd to you, too?
 
Does anyone wonder why these mourners do not mind having pictures taken during their grief? We have seen another woman grieving twice over two different apartments destroyed by Israel, so we know that grieving for the camera is understood as a propaganda opportunity by Hezb'allah.

Did Hicks wonder why this woman is lying on the ground in what looks like her pajamas?  She is not wearing the traditional modest Muslim female dress, as the mourners are.

Even more strikingly, she seems not to have a mark on her! So how did she die as a victim of Israeli attacks? Are they going to allege a poison gas attack?
.
There are no visible signs of destruction around her, either. It looks like a bright and sunny day in someone's backyard to me. 

Was the body of the victim moved from somewhere else?

If she died elsewhere, why didn't the medical personnel that may have moved her take her to a morgue instead of to a backyard?

Could this some sort of mourning rite? It doesn't look very respectful of her, though. Why are her legs splayed open and her head bent back? The pose, fi she was moved, seems particularly jarring because a foreign male is present. This can't be a respectable religious ritual.

Could it be a photo opportunity? Who is that person in the left background? Is that a camera he is holding, maybe waiting for his turn?

The Pieta Pose

Now that I think of it, the girl's pose does remind me of something. This —   the guy that was seen scrambling over rubble to 'rescue' people in rubble, and then showed in a later photo by Tyler Hicks, laid out like a Pieta. When challenged, the Times claimed that he was injured rescuing others and wasn't really meant to be taken as dead.

Like the pajama girl, rubble man shows no signs of physical trauma.

Ed Lasky is the News Editor of The American Thinker

Posted 8 19 06 8:17 AM PDT

Today's print edition front—page of the New York Times (visible here) features a large heart—rending photo, above—the—fold, by Tyler Hicks. A visibly grieving female Arab mourner is being being consoled by another woman. Out of curiosity, I researched other photos of his from the NYT archive, and discovered that Mr. Tyler Hicks certainly does have an eye for Arab suffering.

Check out this Tyler Hicks work for the New York Times.

Does it seem just a bit odd to you, too?
 
Does anyone wonder why these mourners do not mind having pictures taken during their grief? We have seen another woman grieving twice over two different apartments destroyed by Israel, so we know that grieving for the camera is understood as a propaganda opportunity by Hezb'allah.

Did Hicks wonder why this woman is lying on the ground in what looks like her pajamas?  She is not wearing the traditional modest Muslim female dress, as the mourners are.

Even more strikingly, she seems not to have a mark on her! So how did she die as a victim of Israeli attacks? Are they going to allege a poison gas attack?
.
There are no visible signs of destruction around her, either. It looks like a bright and sunny day in someone's backyard to me. 

Was the body of the victim moved from somewhere else?

If she died elsewhere, why didn't the medical personnel that may have moved her take her to a morgue instead of to a backyard?

Could this some sort of mourning rite? It doesn't look very respectful of her, though. Why are her legs splayed open and her head bent back? The pose, fi she was moved, seems particularly jarring because a foreign male is present. This can't be a respectable religious ritual.

Could it be a photo opportunity? Who is that person in the left background? Is that a camera he is holding, maybe waiting for his turn?

The Pieta Pose

Now that I think of it, the girl's pose does remind me of something. This —   the guy that was seen scrambling over rubble to 'rescue' people in rubble, and then showed in a later photo by Tyler Hicks, laid out like a Pieta. When challenged, the Times claimed that he was injured rescuing others and wasn't really meant to be taken as dead.

Like the pajama girl, rubble man shows no signs of physical trauma.

Ed Lasky is the News Editor of The American Thinker

Posted 8 19 06 8:17 AM PDT