America has always found its heroes

Cindy Sheehan began as one of many grieving parents who lost sons and daughters in the Iraq War. Her grief has now been vaulted onto the national stage because of her determination to force President Bush to meet with her, again. Some have raised questions about Sheehan's account of her first meeting with Bush, which occurred two months after the death of her son, Casey, in April 2004. Sheehan was part of a larger group of grieving family members who met with Bush at Fort Lewis in Washington State.

After the meeting, she was quoted by the newspaper in her hometown of Vacaville, Calif., as saying that the president seemed sympathetic. Subsequently, she has said that Bush treated her callously during the meeting. Setting up camp along the road to Bush's ranch in Crawford, Ms. Sheehan has attracted a crowd of supporters, all with one thing in common: a desire to undermine the president and force an end to the war. Before you could say "leftist propaganda," she had a team of public relations professionals and a political consultant working closely with her and directing her performance in a television ad.

In addition, to receiving encouragement from, Michael Moore, the undisputed champion of anti—American diatribe, the distraught woman has attracted Joe Trippi, the guy behind the early success of Howard Dean, before the wannabe president self—destructed in an orgy of verbal pyrotechnics. Every decent human being feels compassion for a parent who loses a child. However, Ms. Sheehan would have made a stronger appeal if she had repudiated the usual hate—Bush rhetoric and the scoundrels that perpetuate it. Although terrorist leaders would relish the scene, the leader of the free world would be foolish indeed if he were to meet with her and allow himself to be scolded in front of international television cameras.

I'm not old enough to remember the mood of the country during World War 2, but America's sentiments can be readily understood by viewing any of the movies made during the war against the Axis powers in Europe. Even during the 50's, a decade after the troops were back home, the films continued to portray the greatness of our country and its fight for freedom around the world. It was a time of John Wayne, James Stewart, and Betty Grable; major stars whose patriotism was self—evident in the roles they played and the additional time they spent supporting the troops. It was a time when men shed their blood fighting on the battlefield and women backed them up with their sweat and tears in defense plants from coast to coast. It was a time when families prayed together and prominently displayed flags in front of their homes to show their love of country and their support of the men in uniform. Legendary comedian, Bob Hope was entertaining the troops at military bases around the world, accompanied by other major Hollywood celebrities. It was a time in our history when we knew the good guys from the bad guys. It was the time of heroes.

Where are the heroes of today? Since the turbulent 60's with its anti—American rhetoric and its drug induced revolution against propriety, we have witnessed an erosion of values that has sought to turn religion into a prohibited practice and patriotism into a foolish philosophy only engaged in by fascists. In 1941, when our naval bases at Pearl Harbor were attacked, it was a wakeup call for America, and the sleeping giant became a well oiled, thundering machine that produced airplanes, tanks, and bombs that would be used to settle the score.

In 2001, when innocent civilians were massacred during the 9/11 attack, President Bush said:

'The people that brought down these buildings will hear from us.'

It was a time when leadership was needed. It was a time for speaking clearly and acting decisively. Once again, it was a time when America needed heroes. Out of the fire, smoke, and ashes of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, a new resolve was born in our country. It was a determination that we, as a nation, will not be cowed into submission by the homicidal lunacy of fanatical terrorists. While other countries have groveled at the feet of the lethal but shadowy international cartel of thugs, America, led by a man of substance, has refused to capitulate. George W. Bush recognizes that we're engaged in a life and death struggle for the survival of western civilization. Ms. Sheehan's protestations notwithstanding, the troops on the field of battle recognize it too. The United States of America, that shining beacon of freedom in a hostile world, has always found its heroes in times of need.

Bob Weir is a former detective sergeant in the New York City Police Department. He is the editor of The News Connection in Highland Village, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com

Cindy Sheehan began as one of many grieving parents who lost sons and daughters in the Iraq War. Her grief has now been vaulted onto the national stage because of her determination to force President Bush to meet with her, again. Some have raised questions about Sheehan's account of her first meeting with Bush, which occurred two months after the death of her son, Casey, in April 2004. Sheehan was part of a larger group of grieving family members who met with Bush at Fort Lewis in Washington State.

After the meeting, she was quoted by the newspaper in her hometown of Vacaville, Calif., as saying that the president seemed sympathetic. Subsequently, she has said that Bush treated her callously during the meeting. Setting up camp along the road to Bush's ranch in Crawford, Ms. Sheehan has attracted a crowd of supporters, all with one thing in common: a desire to undermine the president and force an end to the war. Before you could say "leftist propaganda," she had a team of public relations professionals and a political consultant working closely with her and directing her performance in a television ad.

In addition, to receiving encouragement from, Michael Moore, the undisputed champion of anti—American diatribe, the distraught woman has attracted Joe Trippi, the guy behind the early success of Howard Dean, before the wannabe president self—destructed in an orgy of verbal pyrotechnics. Every decent human being feels compassion for a parent who loses a child. However, Ms. Sheehan would have made a stronger appeal if she had repudiated the usual hate—Bush rhetoric and the scoundrels that perpetuate it. Although terrorist leaders would relish the scene, the leader of the free world would be foolish indeed if he were to meet with her and allow himself to be scolded in front of international television cameras.

I'm not old enough to remember the mood of the country during World War 2, but America's sentiments can be readily understood by viewing any of the movies made during the war against the Axis powers in Europe. Even during the 50's, a decade after the troops were back home, the films continued to portray the greatness of our country and its fight for freedom around the world. It was a time of John Wayne, James Stewart, and Betty Grable; major stars whose patriotism was self—evident in the roles they played and the additional time they spent supporting the troops. It was a time when men shed their blood fighting on the battlefield and women backed them up with their sweat and tears in defense plants from coast to coast. It was a time when families prayed together and prominently displayed flags in front of their homes to show their love of country and their support of the men in uniform. Legendary comedian, Bob Hope was entertaining the troops at military bases around the world, accompanied by other major Hollywood celebrities. It was a time in our history when we knew the good guys from the bad guys. It was the time of heroes.

Where are the heroes of today? Since the turbulent 60's with its anti—American rhetoric and its drug induced revolution against propriety, we have witnessed an erosion of values that has sought to turn religion into a prohibited practice and patriotism into a foolish philosophy only engaged in by fascists. In 1941, when our naval bases at Pearl Harbor were attacked, it was a wakeup call for America, and the sleeping giant became a well oiled, thundering machine that produced airplanes, tanks, and bombs that would be used to settle the score.

In 2001, when innocent civilians were massacred during the 9/11 attack, President Bush said:

'The people that brought down these buildings will hear from us.'

It was a time when leadership was needed. It was a time for speaking clearly and acting decisively. Once again, it was a time when America needed heroes. Out of the fire, smoke, and ashes of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, a new resolve was born in our country. It was a determination that we, as a nation, will not be cowed into submission by the homicidal lunacy of fanatical terrorists. While other countries have groveled at the feet of the lethal but shadowy international cartel of thugs, America, led by a man of substance, has refused to capitulate. George W. Bush recognizes that we're engaged in a life and death struggle for the survival of western civilization. Ms. Sheehan's protestations notwithstanding, the troops on the field of battle recognize it too. The United States of America, that shining beacon of freedom in a hostile world, has always found its heroes in times of need.

Bob Weir is a former detective sergeant in the New York City Police Department. He is the editor of The News Connection in Highland Village, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com