Dean and the Clintons

Nebraska Senator Bob Kerrey (who, for the record, never claimed he spent Christmas in Cambodia) once called Bill Clinton 'an unusually good liar.' Unfortunately, American culture has degenerated to such a point that this statement, coming as it did from a fellow Democrat, was hardly perceived as disparaging the former President.

Throughout the Clinton Presidency, Democratic Party hacks were thoroughly adoring of the manner in which Bill and Hillary were able to slither out of one outrageous scandal after another by means of half—truths, juvenile excuses, and often, blatant lies. Worse yet, they managed to concoct a fairly formidable political persona during this time by inventing tales of their past heroics, thus building 'larger than life' images of themselves, which played well to the perennially gullible.

To the degree that they were successful, they personified Lincoln's adage of 'fooling some of the people all of the time.' And in light of the obvious successes, their methods eventually became widely adopted among Democrats.

But while such tactics worked for the Clintons, others who attempt to follow their example have not fared so well. Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean is, on a daily basis, conclusively proving this point. Hardly a bizarre aberration from the Democrat mainstream (as some embarrassed Democrats are now trying to portray him), Dean instead exemplifies the very essence and soul of liberal thinking and strategy, as institutionalized by the Clintons.

Dean's only problem is that his attempts to demagogue and manipulate the public are patently obvious. Lacking the charms and skill of a Bill Clinton, his condescension, prevarications, and mean—spiritedness are obvious to most, and counterproductive. In short, he is blowing the cover of the Clinton/Democrat political strategy of recent years.

When seeking to impress America's black population, Clinton was shameless in his pandering. At a ceremony commemorating Rosa Parks and the historic effort to end the segregationist practice of requiring blacks to ride at the back of public buses, Clinton claimed that during his youth, and in honor of Parks, he and his friends willingly took seats at the back of the bus.

Later, in another pandering episode, he maintained that upon arriving at La Guardia airport in New York from international flights (though no such flights ever took place) he rode the bus to Harlem just because he so enjoyed being there. One has to wonder if, on those fictitious trips, he also imagined himself seated at the back of the bus.

Clinton's phony 'I feel your pain' compassion was on display with his recollection of burning of black Churches in Arkansas (another series of events that never occurred). Nevertheless, liberal black leaders eventually dubbed Clinton America's first 'Black President.'

Likewise Hillary shamelessly pandered while visiting New Zealand where she claimed to have been named after that nation's renowned mountain climber Sir Edmund Hillary. This too was fraudulent, since at the time of her birth, Sir Edmund had yet to make his historic climb, and was merely an obscure beekeeper.

More ominously, it was Bill Clinton who, in the wake of the Congressional vote for his impeachment, excoriated Republicans in Washington whom he accused of engaging in 'the politics of personal destruction.' Concurrently, he and his army of lawyers worked feverishly to politically disgrace and destroy Congressman Henry Hyde, Independent Prosecutor Ken Starr, and anyone else who posed a threat to them.

In concert with her unscrupulous husband, Hillary masterminded the counterattack in which she vilified his accusers as a 'vast right wing conspiracy,' alleging that the charges against the President were entirely groundless. Amazingly, even in the aftermath of the episode, with virtually every accusation proven to have been factual, Hillary still retains an air of credibility in certain liberal circles.

So who can blame Howard Dean for believing that he can say anything on any occasion with impunity, even if doing so signifies arrogance, bigotry, and hatred, or is in complete contradiction with previous statements and incontrovertible facts? His occasional attempts to reverse course and pander on those issues are as transparent as cellophane.

Nevertheless, his assessments of race, religion, and the nature of conservatism are honest and heart—felt to a degree never achieved by the previous Democrat President.

Far from being an outcast, operating on the fringes of his Party, Dean merely personifies the Clinton political machine without its camouflage. He does what worked, and may still work, for them. As such he is acting as a warning beacon to America, clearly foretelling of what it will face if it ever again plays the fool for the Clintons.

Christopher Adamo is a frequent contributor.

Nebraska Senator Bob Kerrey (who, for the record, never claimed he spent Christmas in Cambodia) once called Bill Clinton 'an unusually good liar.' Unfortunately, American culture has degenerated to such a point that this statement, coming as it did from a fellow Democrat, was hardly perceived as disparaging the former President.

Throughout the Clinton Presidency, Democratic Party hacks were thoroughly adoring of the manner in which Bill and Hillary were able to slither out of one outrageous scandal after another by means of half—truths, juvenile excuses, and often, blatant lies. Worse yet, they managed to concoct a fairly formidable political persona during this time by inventing tales of their past heroics, thus building 'larger than life' images of themselves, which played well to the perennially gullible.

To the degree that they were successful, they personified Lincoln's adage of 'fooling some of the people all of the time.' And in light of the obvious successes, their methods eventually became widely adopted among Democrats.

But while such tactics worked for the Clintons, others who attempt to follow their example have not fared so well. Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean is, on a daily basis, conclusively proving this point. Hardly a bizarre aberration from the Democrat mainstream (as some embarrassed Democrats are now trying to portray him), Dean instead exemplifies the very essence and soul of liberal thinking and strategy, as institutionalized by the Clintons.

Dean's only problem is that his attempts to demagogue and manipulate the public are patently obvious. Lacking the charms and skill of a Bill Clinton, his condescension, prevarications, and mean—spiritedness are obvious to most, and counterproductive. In short, he is blowing the cover of the Clinton/Democrat political strategy of recent years.

When seeking to impress America's black population, Clinton was shameless in his pandering. At a ceremony commemorating Rosa Parks and the historic effort to end the segregationist practice of requiring blacks to ride at the back of public buses, Clinton claimed that during his youth, and in honor of Parks, he and his friends willingly took seats at the back of the bus.

Later, in another pandering episode, he maintained that upon arriving at La Guardia airport in New York from international flights (though no such flights ever took place) he rode the bus to Harlem just because he so enjoyed being there. One has to wonder if, on those fictitious trips, he also imagined himself seated at the back of the bus.

Clinton's phony 'I feel your pain' compassion was on display with his recollection of burning of black Churches in Arkansas (another series of events that never occurred). Nevertheless, liberal black leaders eventually dubbed Clinton America's first 'Black President.'

Likewise Hillary shamelessly pandered while visiting New Zealand where she claimed to have been named after that nation's renowned mountain climber Sir Edmund Hillary. This too was fraudulent, since at the time of her birth, Sir Edmund had yet to make his historic climb, and was merely an obscure beekeeper.

More ominously, it was Bill Clinton who, in the wake of the Congressional vote for his impeachment, excoriated Republicans in Washington whom he accused of engaging in 'the politics of personal destruction.' Concurrently, he and his army of lawyers worked feverishly to politically disgrace and destroy Congressman Henry Hyde, Independent Prosecutor Ken Starr, and anyone else who posed a threat to them.

In concert with her unscrupulous husband, Hillary masterminded the counterattack in which she vilified his accusers as a 'vast right wing conspiracy,' alleging that the charges against the President were entirely groundless. Amazingly, even in the aftermath of the episode, with virtually every accusation proven to have been factual, Hillary still retains an air of credibility in certain liberal circles.

So who can blame Howard Dean for believing that he can say anything on any occasion with impunity, even if doing so signifies arrogance, bigotry, and hatred, or is in complete contradiction with previous statements and incontrovertible facts? His occasional attempts to reverse course and pander on those issues are as transparent as cellophane.

Nevertheless, his assessments of race, religion, and the nature of conservatism are honest and heart—felt to a degree never achieved by the previous Democrat President.

Far from being an outcast, operating on the fringes of his Party, Dean merely personifies the Clinton political machine without its camouflage. He does what worked, and may still work, for them. As such he is acting as a warning beacon to America, clearly foretelling of what it will face if it ever again plays the fool for the Clintons.

Christopher Adamo is a frequent contributor.