The ghettoization of Israel

The original ghetto was not the home of The Boyz in the Hood. In the Middle Ages ghettos were pathetically overcrowded and walled—in neighborhoods, in which Jews were forced to live, a kind of living prison. The ghetto gates were opened by day and locked up by night, to protect cities like Venice from contact with Jews. Today's British academic campaign to boycott two Israeli universities ——— unless they denounce their country ——— has exactly the same aim, to segregate,  dishonor, and cast out Israeli scholars from supposedly more civilized communities. The aim is to turn Israel into a pariah.

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach writes,

"In the 11 years I served as rabbi at Oxford University ... witnessing hatred of Israel at British universities was par for the course. I participated in many Oxford Union debates on Israel in front of hundreds of students. When our side's turn came to speak, we were booed and hissed to the point where our words could often not even be heard."

This is why the boycott campaign is dangerous, and not only for Israel.
European radicals want the same for America. In Belgium they went to court for an arrest warrant against Donald Rumsfeld; two weeks ago they did the same to President Bush in the Netherlands. The fascist Left does not actually expect to put the President of the United States in jail, but they will use the publicity to smear this country.

Over years of continuous public slander, attitudes do change. Today our French and German "friends" whip up votes by scapegoating America, trying to make us a sort of outcast. That is how Jacques Chirac is now trying to persuade his people to vote for the dictatorial EU Constitution. Chirac's message is "vote for the European superstate, and we will beat the Americans for you." Freedom scares the ruling class of Europe.

The good news is that Israeli universities are fighting back. The University of Haifa has sent notice of a libel suit to the British academic union AUT. One useful outcome would be if the union were forced to pay painful damages, to discourage their attempts to demean and ostracize democratic countries.  An internet petition against the academic boycott is gathering steam. The organization Scholars for Peace in the Middle East has found a way for academics around the world to apply for symbolic faculty status at Bar Ilan University, to show their solidarity.

A Swedish scientist I know emailed the union bosses, writing that their
action 

"stands branded in my eyes as an act of sheer prejudice and
discrimination, and I denounce your decision as a despicable act which dishonors your Association and brings shame on those British academics who allow themselves to be led by your decision."
 

Hear, hear.

We do not know how this battle will end.  On May 26, in only two weeks, the AUT bosses will be forced to reconsider their boycott vote. The radicals may win, and strengthen their campaign to turn Israel into another South Africa or  Zimbabwe. Or they may be given a well—deserved bloody nose. Here's hoping.

I have always felt enormously fond of Britain, with its good and decent people. British universities are very creative. As much as we like the people of Britain, however, a boycott against Israel will force many of us to avoid  their country in the future. Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.

The original ghetto was not the home of The Boyz in the Hood. In the Middle Ages ghettos were pathetically overcrowded and walled—in neighborhoods, in which Jews were forced to live, a kind of living prison. The ghetto gates were opened by day and locked up by night, to protect cities like Venice from contact with Jews. Today's British academic campaign to boycott two Israeli universities ——— unless they denounce their country ——— has exactly the same aim, to segregate,  dishonor, and cast out Israeli scholars from supposedly more civilized communities. The aim is to turn Israel into a pariah.

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach writes,

"In the 11 years I served as rabbi at Oxford University ... witnessing hatred of Israel at British universities was par for the course. I participated in many Oxford Union debates on Israel in front of hundreds of students. When our side's turn came to speak, we were booed and hissed to the point where our words could often not even be heard."

This is why the boycott campaign is dangerous, and not only for Israel.
European radicals want the same for America. In Belgium they went to court for an arrest warrant against Donald Rumsfeld; two weeks ago they did the same to President Bush in the Netherlands. The fascist Left does not actually expect to put the President of the United States in jail, but they will use the publicity to smear this country.

Over years of continuous public slander, attitudes do change. Today our French and German "friends" whip up votes by scapegoating America, trying to make us a sort of outcast. That is how Jacques Chirac is now trying to persuade his people to vote for the dictatorial EU Constitution. Chirac's message is "vote for the European superstate, and we will beat the Americans for you." Freedom scares the ruling class of Europe.

The good news is that Israeli universities are fighting back. The University of Haifa has sent notice of a libel suit to the British academic union AUT. One useful outcome would be if the union were forced to pay painful damages, to discourage their attempts to demean and ostracize democratic countries.  An internet petition against the academic boycott is gathering steam. The organization Scholars for Peace in the Middle East has found a way for academics around the world to apply for symbolic faculty status at Bar Ilan University, to show their solidarity.

A Swedish scientist I know emailed the union bosses, writing that their
action 

"stands branded in my eyes as an act of sheer prejudice and
discrimination, and I denounce your decision as a despicable act which dishonors your Association and brings shame on those British academics who allow themselves to be led by your decision."
 

Hear, hear.

We do not know how this battle will end.  On May 26, in only two weeks, the AUT bosses will be forced to reconsider their boycott vote. The radicals may win, and strengthen their campaign to turn Israel into another South Africa or  Zimbabwe. Or they may be given a well—deserved bloody nose. Here's hoping.

I have always felt enormously fond of Britain, with its good and decent people. British universities are very creative. As much as we like the people of Britain, however, a boycott against Israel will force many of us to avoid  their country in the future. Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.