Flying pigs: British Labour plays the race card

Most of us want to think well of the British. We feel a fondness for them, a kind of family tie. Britain seems more like America than the rest of Europe.  Historically the United States grew as a sturdy branch from the British oak. We think of the people there as utterly decent, as most of them genuinely are. It comes as a nasty shock, therefore, to realize how slimy the Labour Party  has been in the campaign culminating in today's election.

Consider these puzzles. Why did Labour put posters all over London showing two Jewish Conservative Members of Parliament as flying pigs?  Why did they picture Tory Leader Michael Howard as the hated Dickensian stereotype of Fagin, the evil Jew?  And why did the Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, go out of his way to insult a Jewish reporter as "a war criminal" and "a Nazi concentration camp guard"? All that just weeks before the election was called.

Tony Blair's political manager let the answer slip out that those three gambits led to media coverage worth million pounds of free publicity. It didn't just happen by chance.

But which voters is the Labour Party riling up with its free publicity? The purpose is not just to insult Jews. There are not enough of them to elect Labour.  As Rod Liddell pointed out in The Spectator,

'There is no 'Jewish' vote in Great Britain any more. ...Certainly, right now, Labour seems to be going out of its way to antagonise the Jews. ... Right now, there is nothing Labour won't do to protect its Muslim vote — and the reason for that is very, very simple.'

So why the flying pigs?

Many Muslims in Europe watch Al Jazeera on satellite TV and hear a daily flood of Jihadist hate speech on the web. Pakistani and Bangladeshi Muslims are even more numerous in the UK, and many of them are awash in Saudi—funded propaganda.

The most common Islamofascist slogan is  "Jews are monkeys and pigs."

Little children learn to say it in Palestinian kindergartens, in elementary
schools in Egypt, in religious madrassahs in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.  The "monkeys and pigs" line is attributed to the Koran, but good and decent Muslims disavow it. Calling someone a pig is the worst insult for Muslims, because pork is considered unclean meat.

Polls are now showing a major drop in Muslim support for the Labour Party. Traditionally 70 percent of them or more voted for Labour. That may now drop in half. That is why Labour spent its campaign showing Jewish politicians as flying pigs, and why Michael Howard was pictured as Charles Dickens' evil Jew, Fagin. And that is why "Red Ken" Livingstone, the most pathological demagogue in Britain, went out of his way to abuse a Jewish reporter in the public media.

Once might be a coincidence; three times is a strategy.

Has Labour no shame? 

The question answers itself. It is the worst possible omen for the future of Europe.

Most of us want to think well of the British. We feel a fondness for them, a kind of family tie. Britain seems more like America than the rest of Europe.  Historically the United States grew as a sturdy branch from the British oak. We think of the people there as utterly decent, as most of them genuinely are. It comes as a nasty shock, therefore, to realize how slimy the Labour Party  has been in the campaign culminating in today's election.

Consider these puzzles. Why did Labour put posters all over London showing two Jewish Conservative Members of Parliament as flying pigs?  Why did they picture Tory Leader Michael Howard as the hated Dickensian stereotype of Fagin, the evil Jew?  And why did the Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, go out of his way to insult a Jewish reporter as "a war criminal" and "a Nazi concentration camp guard"? All that just weeks before the election was called.

Tony Blair's political manager let the answer slip out that those three gambits led to media coverage worth million pounds of free publicity. It didn't just happen by chance.

But which voters is the Labour Party riling up with its free publicity? The purpose is not just to insult Jews. There are not enough of them to elect Labour.  As Rod Liddell pointed out in The Spectator,

'There is no 'Jewish' vote in Great Britain any more. ...Certainly, right now, Labour seems to be going out of its way to antagonise the Jews. ... Right now, there is nothing Labour won't do to protect its Muslim vote — and the reason for that is very, very simple.'

So why the flying pigs?

Many Muslims in Europe watch Al Jazeera on satellite TV and hear a daily flood of Jihadist hate speech on the web. Pakistani and Bangladeshi Muslims are even more numerous in the UK, and many of them are awash in Saudi—funded propaganda.

The most common Islamofascist slogan is  "Jews are monkeys and pigs."

Little children learn to say it in Palestinian kindergartens, in elementary
schools in Egypt, in religious madrassahs in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.  The "monkeys and pigs" line is attributed to the Koran, but good and decent Muslims disavow it. Calling someone a pig is the worst insult for Muslims, because pork is considered unclean meat.

Polls are now showing a major drop in Muslim support for the Labour Party. Traditionally 70 percent of them or more voted for Labour. That may now drop in half. That is why Labour spent its campaign showing Jewish politicians as flying pigs, and why Michael Howard was pictured as Charles Dickens' evil Jew, Fagin. And that is why "Red Ken" Livingstone, the most pathological demagogue in Britain, went out of his way to abuse a Jewish reporter in the public media.

Once might be a coincidence; three times is a strategy.

Has Labour no shame? 

The question answers itself. It is the worst possible omen for the future of Europe.