Dear Mr. Moyers

Dear Mr. Moyers:
 
I've been meaning to write you for quite some time, in fact, if the truth were known, I originally intended to communicate with you in 1964, when as Special Assistant to Lyndon Johnson, you approved that television ad showing a small girl picking daisy petals as a nuclear blast in the background foreshadows, not only her demise but also, the deaths of thousands.  Johnson's voice then came on to tell us, '...We must love each other or we must die.' [!] 
 
Were you trying to set new standards for your successors in coming elections?  At any rate, it worked!  Johnson trounced Senator Goldwater in the presidential election of 1964, 61% to 38%  and your stylized demonization of Republicans continues to this day. 
 
Your recent column of 30 January 2005, entitled, There is no tomorrow,  has finally led me to the distasteful act of communicating with someone I fear who has finally and completely lost all known semblance of reasonableness.  What happened, Moyers?  Was it the loss of this last national election, which finally made you come scurrying out from your pseudo—intellectual bastion of deception and pretense?  From your self—imagined lofty heights you peered over the ramparts and finally saw your defeat and as so many of your kind are apt to do — you panicked, lost it — you blinked!  And now, what, a final frontal assault against your sworn enemies?  Have you lately been hearing General George Pickett whisper in your ear — or for that matter, any other strange voices?
 
In your commentary you prattle on for paragraphs about the Rapture as a way to denigrate all Christians, as if all who believe in the Lord embrace that theory.  In the same article you tell us: Fundamentalist Christians are stupid, President Bush and all who side with him in Congress are delusional, Ronald Reagan must have been nuts because James Watt surely was, Israel and America will lead the world to doom, your fantasies about Karl Rove, Christians aren't concerned at all about the environment, socialism has a place in this world of ours, Zell Miller is also stupid and just for good measure — God doesn't exist.  You better hope God doesn't exist, because if you're wrong, as I believe you are, I think you will be visiting a place of weeping and gnashing of teeth when your time comes.
 
I was especially disturbed to read your idolatry of George Monbiot, that virulent anti—American writer for the Guardian.  You refer to him as 'brilliant' and so I must assume you are in agreement with him when he refers to our Marines as 'murderers' and the Iraq War as 'illegal.'                        

At least, unlike others of your ilk, you don't just criticize without offering alternatives.  You inform us about your 'favorite online environmental journal, the ever—engaging Grist,' which offers us a substitute to the Bible, namely, The Road to Environmental Apocalypse, by Glenn Scherer.  Let me thank you, here and now for telling all of us that it is 'a remarkable work of reporting,' as that will surely prompt me to read it.  On second thought, I just may peruse your suggested reading, as I like to keep abreast of all dangerous anti—American rants.  I've read Mein Kampf, the Communist Manifesto and Lysander Spooner's, No Treason, and so, I might as well add this imagined piece of tripe to my 'watch—list' of perilous philosophies.
 
One might assume your, There is no tomorrow article to be, merely, a rare anomaly of thought, as many of us have from time to time; except lately you seem to be consistent in your fanatical outbursts.  I refer now to your eruption of 2 November 2004,  when you said,

'I think if Kerry were to win this — in a tight race, I think there would be an effort to mount a coup, quite frankly....I mean that the right wing is not going to accept it.' 
 
On 10 November 2004, in a reply to Mayor Ed Koch pertaining to this incident, you said you never mentioned the word 'military' and that,

'I had in mind what happened after the voting in 2000 when Republicans dispatched Congressional staffers to Miami to mount public protests....' 
 
You need to be reminded, a protest does not a coup make, and therefore, I must assume you do not know the true meaning of the word.  Additionally, when a government is suddenly and decisively changed by a coup d'état, it is not always done with force.  I refer you now to the outright sale, by the Roman Army, of the emperorship to Didius Julianus for about five million dollars.        
 
Later on, in There is no tomorrow, you tell us that you gazed at the pictures of your grandchildren and subsequently said aloud, 'Father, forgive us, for we know not what we do.'  As you uttered that prayer, for one brief moment, had you suddenly been converted to Christianity and were you praying for all of us, or did you suddenly see yourself as the Messiah?  You next tell us lucidity returned to you when you realized, '.... We are stealing their future.  Betraying their trust.  Despoiling their world.' And the reason is, we have no 'moral imagination.'      
 
You end your diatribe with a passage from Shakespeare's, King Lear:  Lear asks Gloucester, 'How do you see the world?'  The blind Gloucester replies, 'I see it feelingly,' whereupon you feel compelled to repeat the answer for all of us, so as to give us some insight into your presently, tormented psyche. 
 
Since you conclude your dialogue with a quotation, I now feel obligated to return the favor.  This one is to be found in Oscar Wilde's, Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3: 'A man who moralizes is usually a hypocrite....'
 
 
I look forward to your response with eager anticipation and do sincerely hope you are 'feeling' well.

Dear Mr. Moyers:
 
I've been meaning to write you for quite some time, in fact, if the truth were known, I originally intended to communicate with you in 1964, when as Special Assistant to Lyndon Johnson, you approved that television ad showing a small girl picking daisy petals as a nuclear blast in the background foreshadows, not only her demise but also, the deaths of thousands.  Johnson's voice then came on to tell us, '...We must love each other or we must die.' [!] 
 
Were you trying to set new standards for your successors in coming elections?  At any rate, it worked!  Johnson trounced Senator Goldwater in the presidential election of 1964, 61% to 38%  and your stylized demonization of Republicans continues to this day. 
 
Your recent column of 30 January 2005, entitled, There is no tomorrow,  has finally led me to the distasteful act of communicating with someone I fear who has finally and completely lost all known semblance of reasonableness.  What happened, Moyers?  Was it the loss of this last national election, which finally made you come scurrying out from your pseudo—intellectual bastion of deception and pretense?  From your self—imagined lofty heights you peered over the ramparts and finally saw your defeat and as so many of your kind are apt to do — you panicked, lost it — you blinked!  And now, what, a final frontal assault against your sworn enemies?  Have you lately been hearing General George Pickett whisper in your ear — or for that matter, any other strange voices?
 
In your commentary you prattle on for paragraphs about the Rapture as a way to denigrate all Christians, as if all who believe in the Lord embrace that theory.  In the same article you tell us: Fundamentalist Christians are stupid, President Bush and all who side with him in Congress are delusional, Ronald Reagan must have been nuts because James Watt surely was, Israel and America will lead the world to doom, your fantasies about Karl Rove, Christians aren't concerned at all about the environment, socialism has a place in this world of ours, Zell Miller is also stupid and just for good measure — God doesn't exist.  You better hope God doesn't exist, because if you're wrong, as I believe you are, I think you will be visiting a place of weeping and gnashing of teeth when your time comes.
 
I was especially disturbed to read your idolatry of George Monbiot, that virulent anti—American writer for the Guardian.  You refer to him as 'brilliant' and so I must assume you are in agreement with him when he refers to our Marines as 'murderers' and the Iraq War as 'illegal.'                        

At least, unlike others of your ilk, you don't just criticize without offering alternatives.  You inform us about your 'favorite online environmental journal, the ever—engaging Grist,' which offers us a substitute to the Bible, namely, The Road to Environmental Apocalypse, by Glenn Scherer.  Let me thank you, here and now for telling all of us that it is 'a remarkable work of reporting,' as that will surely prompt me to read it.  On second thought, I just may peruse your suggested reading, as I like to keep abreast of all dangerous anti—American rants.  I've read Mein Kampf, the Communist Manifesto and Lysander Spooner's, No Treason, and so, I might as well add this imagined piece of tripe to my 'watch—list' of perilous philosophies.
 
One might assume your, There is no tomorrow article to be, merely, a rare anomaly of thought, as many of us have from time to time; except lately you seem to be consistent in your fanatical outbursts.  I refer now to your eruption of 2 November 2004,  when you said,

'I think if Kerry were to win this — in a tight race, I think there would be an effort to mount a coup, quite frankly....I mean that the right wing is not going to accept it.' 
 
On 10 November 2004, in a reply to Mayor Ed Koch pertaining to this incident, you said you never mentioned the word 'military' and that,

'I had in mind what happened after the voting in 2000 when Republicans dispatched Congressional staffers to Miami to mount public protests....' 
 
You need to be reminded, a protest does not a coup make, and therefore, I must assume you do not know the true meaning of the word.  Additionally, when a government is suddenly and decisively changed by a coup d'état, it is not always done with force.  I refer you now to the outright sale, by the Roman Army, of the emperorship to Didius Julianus for about five million dollars.        
 
Later on, in There is no tomorrow, you tell us that you gazed at the pictures of your grandchildren and subsequently said aloud, 'Father, forgive us, for we know not what we do.'  As you uttered that prayer, for one brief moment, had you suddenly been converted to Christianity and were you praying for all of us, or did you suddenly see yourself as the Messiah?  You next tell us lucidity returned to you when you realized, '.... We are stealing their future.  Betraying their trust.  Despoiling their world.' And the reason is, we have no 'moral imagination.'      
 
You end your diatribe with a passage from Shakespeare's, King Lear:  Lear asks Gloucester, 'How do you see the world?'  The blind Gloucester replies, 'I see it feelingly,' whereupon you feel compelled to repeat the answer for all of us, so as to give us some insight into your presently, tormented psyche. 
 
Since you conclude your dialogue with a quotation, I now feel obligated to return the favor.  This one is to be found in Oscar Wilde's, Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3: 'A man who moralizes is usually a hypocrite....'
 
 
I look forward to your response with eager anticipation and do sincerely hope you are 'feeling' well.