Don't mess with God

Weir thinking about it  

If the Democrats learned anything from the presidential election of 2004 it is that they cannot repudiate the religious community in America and still expect to win. Although the extremist wing of their party will probably never cease to refer to conservative Republicans as 'religious nuts' or 'Jesus freaks,' the more sensible among them will not want to see another scarlet map with GOP domination of the country.

Although there were many reasons for President Bush's reelection victory, his strong religious convictions made him the best choice for a country that was founded on faith in God. Mr. Bush set the standard in 2000 during his first race for Chief Executive. When asked who his favorite political philosopher was, he proudly stated, Jesus Christ. 

Expect to see Hillary Clinton 'get religion' during the next 4 years as she plans her campaign for the White House. Already, her hubby Bill is making references to the Bible, and recently, House Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi, quoted from the Gospel of Matthew. Sadly, for their sake, they have allowed themselves to be influenced and even seduced by the values of that leftist, propaganda producing, cocaine—sniffing coterie of moral misfits known as the Hollywood Glitterati.

If they want to continue being seen in the company of religion bashers like Michael Moore, Whoopi Goldberg, Susan Sarandon, Alec Baldwin, and other supporters of an 'anything goes' society, they may as well resign themselves to being the minority party for a very long time. However, any chameleon—like camouflage on their part will be highly suspect in light of their cozy past with anti—religious provocateurs. It remains to be seen if the voting public has a short memory when it comes to those who have made their positions clear regarding traditional values in America.
 
Speaking of values, Republican Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who was ably assisted by President Bush during the senator's successful reelection campaign, didn't waste any time biting the hand that fed him. During 15 visits to the Keystone State, the president rallied support for the 5 term incumbent, helping to stave off a strong opponent. Yet, the day after the election, when his victory was assured, the senator said Supreme Court nominees who wanted to undo abortion rights would face tough confirmation battles in the Senate. Inasmuch as the president has made it clear that he abhors the idea of a litmus test for court appointees, the Senator was taking an obvious slap at the leadership of the man who campaigned vigorously for him.

If Mr. Specter were a man of character he would have made those views clear during his very close election struggle when Mr. Bush was wooing votes for him. Instead, he requested and gladly accepted support from the popular leader of his party and then stabbed him in the back at the first opportunity. As a result of his perfidy, his ascension to the chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee was in jeopardy until he swore fealty to the President's appointees, which he did publicly this past week.

Majority Leader, Senator Bill Frist had said he was troubled by Specter's remarks about potential judicial nominees and felt his colleague must convince his fellow Republicans that he deserves the new post. "The Senate is a remarkable institution and it has a system and a program and a plan by which you choose the chairmen of various committees like the Judiciary Committee,' Dr. Frist said, noting that the choices will not be final until the new Senate convenes in January. But before that happens, Dr. Frist said, Mr. Specter should lobby his GOP colleagues in the Senate's lame—duck session this week.  Since President Bush will almost certainly have to fill at least one seat on the top court, GOP leaders wanted to know if Specter intends to be an obstacle. Furthermore, many Republicans have never forgiven Specter for his opposition to conservative judge Robert Bork, who was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1987, but not confirmed. Evidently, Republicans, like their trunk—wielding symbol, have long memories.

Senator Specter complied. Now chastened, and firmly committed to the team effort, he will apparently take his place at the head of the Judiciary Committee. A good resolution. 

Bob Weir is a former detective sergeant in the New York City policy department. He is the editor of The News Connection in Highland Village, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com

Weir thinking about it  

If the Democrats learned anything from the presidential election of 2004 it is that they cannot repudiate the religious community in America and still expect to win. Although the extremist wing of their party will probably never cease to refer to conservative Republicans as 'religious nuts' or 'Jesus freaks,' the more sensible among them will not want to see another scarlet map with GOP domination of the country.

Although there were many reasons for President Bush's reelection victory, his strong religious convictions made him the best choice for a country that was founded on faith in God. Mr. Bush set the standard in 2000 during his first race for Chief Executive. When asked who his favorite political philosopher was, he proudly stated, Jesus Christ. 

Expect to see Hillary Clinton 'get religion' during the next 4 years as she plans her campaign for the White House. Already, her hubby Bill is making references to the Bible, and recently, House Minority Leader, Nancy Pelosi, quoted from the Gospel of Matthew. Sadly, for their sake, they have allowed themselves to be influenced and even seduced by the values of that leftist, propaganda producing, cocaine—sniffing coterie of moral misfits known as the Hollywood Glitterati.

If they want to continue being seen in the company of religion bashers like Michael Moore, Whoopi Goldberg, Susan Sarandon, Alec Baldwin, and other supporters of an 'anything goes' society, they may as well resign themselves to being the minority party for a very long time. However, any chameleon—like camouflage on their part will be highly suspect in light of their cozy past with anti—religious provocateurs. It remains to be seen if the voting public has a short memory when it comes to those who have made their positions clear regarding traditional values in America.
 
Speaking of values, Republican Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, who was ably assisted by President Bush during the senator's successful reelection campaign, didn't waste any time biting the hand that fed him. During 15 visits to the Keystone State, the president rallied support for the 5 term incumbent, helping to stave off a strong opponent. Yet, the day after the election, when his victory was assured, the senator said Supreme Court nominees who wanted to undo abortion rights would face tough confirmation battles in the Senate. Inasmuch as the president has made it clear that he abhors the idea of a litmus test for court appointees, the Senator was taking an obvious slap at the leadership of the man who campaigned vigorously for him.

If Mr. Specter were a man of character he would have made those views clear during his very close election struggle when Mr. Bush was wooing votes for him. Instead, he requested and gladly accepted support from the popular leader of his party and then stabbed him in the back at the first opportunity. As a result of his perfidy, his ascension to the chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee was in jeopardy until he swore fealty to the President's appointees, which he did publicly this past week.

Majority Leader, Senator Bill Frist had said he was troubled by Specter's remarks about potential judicial nominees and felt his colleague must convince his fellow Republicans that he deserves the new post. "The Senate is a remarkable institution and it has a system and a program and a plan by which you choose the chairmen of various committees like the Judiciary Committee,' Dr. Frist said, noting that the choices will not be final until the new Senate convenes in January. But before that happens, Dr. Frist said, Mr. Specter should lobby his GOP colleagues in the Senate's lame—duck session this week.  Since President Bush will almost certainly have to fill at least one seat on the top court, GOP leaders wanted to know if Specter intends to be an obstacle. Furthermore, many Republicans have never forgiven Specter for his opposition to conservative judge Robert Bork, who was nominated to the Supreme Court in 1987, but not confirmed. Evidently, Republicans, like their trunk—wielding symbol, have long memories.

Senator Specter complied. Now chastened, and firmly committed to the team effort, he will apparently take his place at the head of the Judiciary Committee. A good resolution. 

Bob Weir is a former detective sergeant in the New York City policy department. He is the editor of The News Connection in Highland Village, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com