It's Never Good Enough for the Left

Here in Detroit, a good way to test one's ability to keep his or her blood pressure in check is to tune into WJR radio from 3—6 on weekday afternoons. 

Taking the microphone is Mitch Albom, once a great sportswriter, yet better known around the nation for authoring Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom's tremendous success has gone to his head, and to say he has turned into a condescending know—it—all is to show great restraint. He suffers from an affliction common among members of the media who get a little success — suddenly they are experts about society at large.

Albom's mission on his radio program, despite its being a variety show of sorts, seems to be to counter the three hours of what he endlessly labels 'Hate Radio,' known to the rest of us as the Rush Limbaugh show. Albom hides behind a requisite claim of objectivity in every utterance and every debate regarding politics and current affairs. Nonetheless, one is hard—pressed to recall an instance in which Albom has ever had anything decent to say about President George W. Bush. Indeed, when the President recently visited Turkey and mentioned the success of NBA champion Detroit Piston Mehmet Okur of Turkey, the President had some trouble with the pronunciation. Albom kept himself in stitches by playing the President's gaffe over and over again.

During his show of August 23, Albom began a segment regarding the television ads by the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT) by asking his listeners to call in to answer a simple question: Would the President denounce the SBVT ads more forcefully than he had earlier that day? The President, during brief remarks to the media, actually denounced the ads, reiterated his thought that John Kerry's service in Vietnam was honorable, and that he wished all 527 groups would cease and desist. This was pointed out by a couple of callers during the show.  

Yet this was not enough for Albom, nor will it be enough to satisfy the multitude of President Bush's critics in the leftist press. Albom declared that the President should have honored Kerry's service earlier (even though the President has done so since it became clear months ago that Kerry was going to be the nominee), and that to the President's words were 'disingenuous' and 'too late.' Albom then proclaimed that because the President is the incumbent in this race, the onus is on him to somehow single—handedly stop every 527 group from spending money and buying ad time on television and radio, never mind that it has been Kerry that dredged up Vietnam in the first place, and that the fight between Kerry and SBVT is personal and long—standing, and really does not involve the President at all.

How typical. The hatred for President Bush among the left is rooted so deeply that nothing he says or does is viewed simply for what it is. African—American 'leaders' see no irony in labeling the President and his Administration racists worthy of the Confederacy. If one deigns to point out that two of the most powerful people in the President's Cabinet are African—Americans, the charge, made without irony, is that Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice are Uncle Toms or stooges of President Bush. Democrats routinely have no problem slapping the faces of the over 30 nations that are contributing to the war on terrorism by charging that the President has spoiled American relationships abroad and is alienating the entire planet. If your flag does not carry the colors of France or Germany, you do not count.  

When President Bush and the Administration identified the Axis of Evil in the wake of September 11, 2001, and the anguished cries for the President to make a case for war against Saddam Hussein to Congress from Tom Daschle were heard throughout the land, the President made the case to Congress, and Congress authorized action. When France, Germany, and the rest of the 'civilized' world demanded further proof of the evil of Hussein's regime (as if there was some sort of lack thereof), the President made the case to the General Assembly of the United Nations on September 12, 2002 . He simply asked the UN to do the job it had neglected for over a decade.

When Hussein and Osama bin Laden were not captured by Coalition forces five minutes after hostilities began, the left shouted 'quagmire' and compared President Bush to Adolf Hitler.

The list is endless, and includes the ridiculous specter of the Democratic nominee for the Presidency parroting a propaganda filmmaker's assertions regarding the President's reaction to being told of the second plane hitting the World Trade Center. Even Janet Jackson is saying that the President sprung into action after her 'wardrobe malfunction' to distract us all from the war in Iraq.  We await the explanation of why it will be President Bush's fault if the U.S. men's basketball team fails to medal in Athens.

Once again, it is up to the sensible, reasoned, and sane among us to encourage our friends, neighbors, and colleagues to vote for the President on November 2. Mitch Albom and his bunch may have the power of the airwaves and mainstream media outlets. They have the power to annoy, pester, and infuriate us when remarking on matters that are so beyond their competence it is tempting to pity them. Yet we must remember, no matter how frustrating and ostrich—like these creatures seem to be, we the people have the final say. It is up to us to re—elect President Bush, and send the media into a frenzy from which they will never recover.   

Matthew May is a freelance writer and can be reached at millmay7@yahoo.com

Here in Detroit, a good way to test one's ability to keep his or her blood pressure in check is to tune into WJR radio from 3—6 on weekday afternoons. 

Taking the microphone is Mitch Albom, once a great sportswriter, yet better known around the nation for authoring Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom's tremendous success has gone to his head, and to say he has turned into a condescending know—it—all is to show great restraint. He suffers from an affliction common among members of the media who get a little success — suddenly they are experts about society at large.

Albom's mission on his radio program, despite its being a variety show of sorts, seems to be to counter the three hours of what he endlessly labels 'Hate Radio,' known to the rest of us as the Rush Limbaugh show. Albom hides behind a requisite claim of objectivity in every utterance and every debate regarding politics and current affairs. Nonetheless, one is hard—pressed to recall an instance in which Albom has ever had anything decent to say about President George W. Bush. Indeed, when the President recently visited Turkey and mentioned the success of NBA champion Detroit Piston Mehmet Okur of Turkey, the President had some trouble with the pronunciation. Albom kept himself in stitches by playing the President's gaffe over and over again.

During his show of August 23, Albom began a segment regarding the television ads by the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT) by asking his listeners to call in to answer a simple question: Would the President denounce the SBVT ads more forcefully than he had earlier that day? The President, during brief remarks to the media, actually denounced the ads, reiterated his thought that John Kerry's service in Vietnam was honorable, and that he wished all 527 groups would cease and desist. This was pointed out by a couple of callers during the show.  

Yet this was not enough for Albom, nor will it be enough to satisfy the multitude of President Bush's critics in the leftist press. Albom declared that the President should have honored Kerry's service earlier (even though the President has done so since it became clear months ago that Kerry was going to be the nominee), and that to the President's words were 'disingenuous' and 'too late.' Albom then proclaimed that because the President is the incumbent in this race, the onus is on him to somehow single—handedly stop every 527 group from spending money and buying ad time on television and radio, never mind that it has been Kerry that dredged up Vietnam in the first place, and that the fight between Kerry and SBVT is personal and long—standing, and really does not involve the President at all.

How typical. The hatred for President Bush among the left is rooted so deeply that nothing he says or does is viewed simply for what it is. African—American 'leaders' see no irony in labeling the President and his Administration racists worthy of the Confederacy. If one deigns to point out that two of the most powerful people in the President's Cabinet are African—Americans, the charge, made without irony, is that Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice are Uncle Toms or stooges of President Bush. Democrats routinely have no problem slapping the faces of the over 30 nations that are contributing to the war on terrorism by charging that the President has spoiled American relationships abroad and is alienating the entire planet. If your flag does not carry the colors of France or Germany, you do not count.  

When President Bush and the Administration identified the Axis of Evil in the wake of September 11, 2001, and the anguished cries for the President to make a case for war against Saddam Hussein to Congress from Tom Daschle were heard throughout the land, the President made the case to Congress, and Congress authorized action. When France, Germany, and the rest of the 'civilized' world demanded further proof of the evil of Hussein's regime (as if there was some sort of lack thereof), the President made the case to the General Assembly of the United Nations on September 12, 2002 . He simply asked the UN to do the job it had neglected for over a decade.

When Hussein and Osama bin Laden were not captured by Coalition forces five minutes after hostilities began, the left shouted 'quagmire' and compared President Bush to Adolf Hitler.

The list is endless, and includes the ridiculous specter of the Democratic nominee for the Presidency parroting a propaganda filmmaker's assertions regarding the President's reaction to being told of the second plane hitting the World Trade Center. Even Janet Jackson is saying that the President sprung into action after her 'wardrobe malfunction' to distract us all from the war in Iraq.  We await the explanation of why it will be President Bush's fault if the U.S. men's basketball team fails to medal in Athens.

Once again, it is up to the sensible, reasoned, and sane among us to encourage our friends, neighbors, and colleagues to vote for the President on November 2. Mitch Albom and his bunch may have the power of the airwaves and mainstream media outlets. They have the power to annoy, pester, and infuriate us when remarking on matters that are so beyond their competence it is tempting to pity them. Yet we must remember, no matter how frustrating and ostrich—like these creatures seem to be, we the people have the final say. It is up to us to re—elect President Bush, and send the media into a frenzy from which they will never recover.   

Matthew May is a freelance writer and can be reached at millmay7@yahoo.com