Sometimes French

During the traditional Bastille Day press interview, French President Chirac was asked to touch on the violent anti—Semitic wave shaking France. He replied,

'Our fellow Jews, Muslims or others, or simply sometimes French are victims of aggressions because they do not belong to such and such community.'

France is facing a huge ticking bomb where a 'Lebanization'— total disconnect between the different religious communities— of the society is not out of the question.

So, instead of gathering all French citizens under one umbrella, which is one of the most important tasks of his government, Chirac is putting oil on fire by distinguishing between French Jews, French Muslims and ordinary French.

Nice way to go, especially on the National Day...

These remarks reminded me of what French Prime Minister Barre said in 1980 after the terrorist bombing on a Paris synagogue: 'a heinous attack which targeted Jews going to the synagogue but killed innocent French crossing the street.'

Thus, even if French Jews have been in France for centuries, they are still not considered as full and true citizens.

During the traditional Bastille Day press interview, French President Chirac was asked to touch on the violent anti—Semitic wave shaking France. He replied,

'Our fellow Jews, Muslims or others, or simply sometimes French are victims of aggressions because they do not belong to such and such community.'

France is facing a huge ticking bomb where a 'Lebanization'— total disconnect between the different religious communities— of the society is not out of the question.

So, instead of gathering all French citizens under one umbrella, which is one of the most important tasks of his government, Chirac is putting oil on fire by distinguishing between French Jews, French Muslims and ordinary French.

Nice way to go, especially on the National Day...

These remarks reminded me of what French Prime Minister Barre said in 1980 after the terrorist bombing on a Paris synagogue: 'a heinous attack which targeted Jews going to the synagogue but killed innocent French crossing the street.'

Thus, even if French Jews have been in France for centuries, they are still not considered as full and true citizens.