Children of America

Their faces are smudged with dirt and mud, sandstorms have left them scarred and weary, they sleep sporadically and restlessly due to the constant peril, yet America's army of volunteers continue to advance against a deeply entrenched enemy and in doing so, lose some comrades along the way. These young men and women, thousands of miles from home, are not Republicans or Democrats, conservatives or liberals; they are the valiant symbols of freedom that have always fought and died for the liberties and the lifestyles enjoyed by millions. They come from the hills of Pennsylvania and the farms of Iowa; they come from the valleys of California and the deserts of Nevada; they come from the sprawling plains of Texas, and from the concrete canyons of New York City; they come from the mountains of Tennessee and the shorelines of Florida. They are every shade of skin color and every religious creed; they are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and our respect. 

They look like the young folks we see in our neighborhoods, riding their bicycles along the avenue, or throwing a football in the park. They could be the progeny of your friends at work, or the next—door neighbors' son or daughter. Perhaps they are the youngsters who only recently graduated from a high school in your area; or they might be the kids who used to deliver the local paper to your doorstep. You may remember them as teammates in local sports groups, or members of the Boy or Girl Scouts. In any case, they have chosen a military career and are now on a distant battlefield, engaged in a struggle to free an oppressed people and remove a threat to our future. They have every reason to believe their cause is just, and they need to know that we support them. They are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and our respect. 

Parents watch the television screen with anxious eyes and say silent prayers for an early end to the fighting and a safe return of their loved ones. Every explosive sound of gunfire and each flashing light from bomb attacks send ripples of fear through the hearts and minds of the families at home. They wait in fearful anticipation as each Pentagon briefing gives the latest update on the progress, and the growing list of casualties. From time to time, they see images of raucous protesters holding signs that make profane references to the President and criticize the actions taken by the troops. Tears glisten in their eyes and they shake their heads sadly, hoping the behavior of the demonstrators will not give confidence to the enemy and embolden them to take more American lives. They grit their teeth and set their jaws firmly as they summon the courage to get them through another day of dread and uncertainty. They are the parents of the children of America and they deserve our admiration and respect.

If your children are not in harm's way tonight, you can thank the thousands of others who took their places in the foxholes and trenches of a foreign land, giving all they have for the country that gives so much in return. As young as they are, they know the value of freedom because they see the hopelessness on the faces of those who have been forced to live without it. As young as they are, they know that evil is more than a casual reference in a Presidential speech; it is a malevolent force that exists in the world and must, from time to time, be challenged and defeated if there is to be a future for civilized people. As young as they are, they understand the need to eliminate the violent regimes of tyrants who brutalize, torture, and murder those who oppose them. As young as they are, they have tasted the blood of battle and have experienced the stench of death; they have watched their friends expire and heard their agonized screams. As young as they are, they have put their lives at risk so we can continue to enjoy the fruits of this great nation. They are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and respect.

Bob Weir is a columnist for The American Thinker. The author of 7 books, he is a retired NYPD sergeant, living in Flower Mound, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com

Their faces are smudged with dirt and mud, sandstorms have left them scarred and weary, they sleep sporadically and restlessly due to the constant peril, yet America's army of volunteers continue to advance against a deeply entrenched enemy and in doing so, lose some comrades along the way. These young men and women, thousands of miles from home, are not Republicans or Democrats, conservatives or liberals; they are the valiant symbols of freedom that have always fought and died for the liberties and the lifestyles enjoyed by millions. They come from the hills of Pennsylvania and the farms of Iowa; they come from the valleys of California and the deserts of Nevada; they come from the sprawling plains of Texas, and from the concrete canyons of New York City; they come from the mountains of Tennessee and the shorelines of Florida. They are every shade of skin color and every religious creed; they are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and our respect. 

They look like the young folks we see in our neighborhoods, riding their bicycles along the avenue, or throwing a football in the park. They could be the progeny of your friends at work, or the next—door neighbors' son or daughter. Perhaps they are the youngsters who only recently graduated from a high school in your area; or they might be the kids who used to deliver the local paper to your doorstep. You may remember them as teammates in local sports groups, or members of the Boy or Girl Scouts. In any case, they have chosen a military career and are now on a distant battlefield, engaged in a struggle to free an oppressed people and remove a threat to our future. They have every reason to believe their cause is just, and they need to know that we support them. They are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and our respect. 

Parents watch the television screen with anxious eyes and say silent prayers for an early end to the fighting and a safe return of their loved ones. Every explosive sound of gunfire and each flashing light from bomb attacks send ripples of fear through the hearts and minds of the families at home. They wait in fearful anticipation as each Pentagon briefing gives the latest update on the progress, and the growing list of casualties. From time to time, they see images of raucous protesters holding signs that make profane references to the President and criticize the actions taken by the troops. Tears glisten in their eyes and they shake their heads sadly, hoping the behavior of the demonstrators will not give confidence to the enemy and embolden them to take more American lives. They grit their teeth and set their jaws firmly as they summon the courage to get them through another day of dread and uncertainty. They are the parents of the children of America and they deserve our admiration and respect.

If your children are not in harm's way tonight, you can thank the thousands of others who took their places in the foxholes and trenches of a foreign land, giving all they have for the country that gives so much in return. As young as they are, they know the value of freedom because they see the hopelessness on the faces of those who have been forced to live without it. As young as they are, they know that evil is more than a casual reference in a Presidential speech; it is a malevolent force that exists in the world and must, from time to time, be challenged and defeated if there is to be a future for civilized people. As young as they are, they understand the need to eliminate the violent regimes of tyrants who brutalize, torture, and murder those who oppose them. As young as they are, they have tasted the blood of battle and have experienced the stench of death; they have watched their friends expire and heard their agonized screams. As young as they are, they have put their lives at risk so we can continue to enjoy the fruits of this great nation. They are the children of America and they deserve our admiration and respect.

Bob Weir is a columnist for The American Thinker. The author of 7 books, he is a retired NYPD sergeant, living in Flower Mound, Texas. BobWeir777@aol.com