Blair's 'Aznar moment' in House of Commons

It's one thing to sensibly argue the pros and cons of the EU Constitution in relation to British economic, political and strategic interests. But it is quite another to use the dreadful events in Madrid, and the generally higher level of fear of terrorism amongst the population, to bounce the UK — which itself does not have a written Constitution — into a flawed EU Constitution, which has been hurried along by the determined political will of career Eurocrats.

The British Prime Minister has been boasting that his red lines will enable Britain to maintain sovereignty in the areas of criminal justice, foreign policy, social services and taxation. Well hurrah for our savior. He's managed to hold on to four policy areas —— you can count those on one hand. Big deal. That's like losing a game of soccer ten goals to three and expecting jubilant celebration.

If implemented in its current form, the EU Constitution will go down as the biggest political stitch—up in British and European history.

 

The British Prime Minister was desperately scraping the deep and dark bottom of the manipulation barrel in the House of Commons, on Monday 29th of March, 2004, when he said:

 

"This treaty is right for Europe and right for Britain because, in today's world — particularly after the events of recent months — Europe needs to work more effectively to protect and enhance the lives of its people."

 

A European Constitution is not necessary to effectively fight terrorism, and Blair knows it perfectly well. The Americans and British have the most productive intelligence sharing partnership in the world, and have accomplished it without a joint Constitution. It works through good faith and co—operation, based on shared values and political traditions.

 

Tony Blair's logic stream dishonestly suggests that somehow the UK is going to be safer from terrorist attacks if it adopts the EU Constitution. Al—Qaeda may be a dangerous threat to the West, but arguing that Britain should give away its legal dominion to a Super State, just to defeat one terrorist organization, is completely barmy.

 

It also makes Blair something of an appeaser, because he's confessedly allowing terrorists to direct his actions on issues related to Britain's Sovereignty. The Spanish only changed a national government — Blair's giving most of Britain away to a bunch of Eurocrats in Brussels.

 

Al—Qaeda must be ecstatic that their handiwork has had such a profound effect on the British head of state. Unfortunately, the terrorists get what they want; Tony Blair gets what he wants — a reason to believe he may become EU President — and the big dumb losers are the British people who don't even get a say in the matter.

 

Michael Howard, the leader of the Conservatives, must take Blair to task over his cynical use of the Madrid terrorist attacks as a prelude to the EU Constitution. Manipulating events such as the terror attacks and being found out — as Blair's friend Aznar could tell him — is a one way ticket to the dustbin of history.

 

Howard's chance has come — more the pity if he wastes it.

Michael Morris is our London Correspondent

It's one thing to sensibly argue the pros and cons of the EU Constitution in relation to British economic, political and strategic interests. But it is quite another to use the dreadful events in Madrid, and the generally higher level of fear of terrorism amongst the population, to bounce the UK — which itself does not have a written Constitution — into a flawed EU Constitution, which has been hurried along by the determined political will of career Eurocrats.

The British Prime Minister has been boasting that his red lines will enable Britain to maintain sovereignty in the areas of criminal justice, foreign policy, social services and taxation. Well hurrah for our savior. He's managed to hold on to four policy areas —— you can count those on one hand. Big deal. That's like losing a game of soccer ten goals to three and expecting jubilant celebration.

If implemented in its current form, the EU Constitution will go down as the biggest political stitch—up in British and European history.

 

The British Prime Minister was desperately scraping the deep and dark bottom of the manipulation barrel in the House of Commons, on Monday 29th of March, 2004, when he said:

 

"This treaty is right for Europe and right for Britain because, in today's world — particularly after the events of recent months — Europe needs to work more effectively to protect and enhance the lives of its people."

 

A European Constitution is not necessary to effectively fight terrorism, and Blair knows it perfectly well. The Americans and British have the most productive intelligence sharing partnership in the world, and have accomplished it without a joint Constitution. It works through good faith and co—operation, based on shared values and political traditions.

 

Tony Blair's logic stream dishonestly suggests that somehow the UK is going to be safer from terrorist attacks if it adopts the EU Constitution. Al—Qaeda may be a dangerous threat to the West, but arguing that Britain should give away its legal dominion to a Super State, just to defeat one terrorist organization, is completely barmy.

 

It also makes Blair something of an appeaser, because he's confessedly allowing terrorists to direct his actions on issues related to Britain's Sovereignty. The Spanish only changed a national government — Blair's giving most of Britain away to a bunch of Eurocrats in Brussels.

 

Al—Qaeda must be ecstatic that their handiwork has had such a profound effect on the British head of state. Unfortunately, the terrorists get what they want; Tony Blair gets what he wants — a reason to believe he may become EU President — and the big dumb losers are the British people who don't even get a say in the matter.

 

Michael Howard, the leader of the Conservatives, must take Blair to task over his cynical use of the Madrid terrorist attacks as a prelude to the EU Constitution. Manipulating events such as the terror attacks and being found out — as Blair's friend Aznar could tell him — is a one way ticket to the dustbin of history.

 

Howard's chance has come — more the pity if he wastes it.

Michael Morris is our London Correspondent