Blair and Bush � Stronger at the End of a Spanish Week

Recent events across the world may have inadvertently strengthened Blair's and Bush's hand. Whatever one may think of the Iraq War; any intellectually honest person has to admire the two leaders' staying power and strength of will. As some of the Western media are blathering about the Coalition's house falling down, Blair and Bush are relentlessly driving on with what they know is the essential objective: get Iraq back on its feet.

 

At first, it was natural to perceive events in Spain as harmful to the Coalition and the war on terror. While there can be no doubt that Spain's capitulation will increase the likelihood of another bomb attack in Europe, there are positive ramifications which arise from the sheep—like behavior of the Spaniards, and their new Prime Minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

 

Those Spanish voters, who under the influence of some form of group psychosis, stopped thinking clearly as they cast their votes, will one day look back in shame. It was almost as if —— suffering the anguish and shock of the terrorist attacks —— they could not step outside of that emotional environment, and see themselves and their moment of decision with objective clarity. They performed this act for us, on our television sets, on the radio and across the internet.

 

Of course, for the rest of us; the lesson learned could not be more poignant. The Spanish showed us exactly what not to do when Al—Qaeda surely comes knocking again. For that, at least, we can thank them.

 

Perhaps gratitude should also be showered on the accidental Zapatero. Give him a round of applause because his defeatist words and actions, have only increased the admiration many of us have for the leaders of the Coalition. The contrast in strength of character between Senor Zapatero and either Blair or Bush could not be sharper. They —— unlike him —— have some 'cojones', as the Spanish would say.

 

Another more positive outcome from Spain's defeat was that the Australians, Danes, Poles, and a few other Coalition members were so disgusted by Zapatero that they stepped up to the plate and categorically pledged to stand firm with  Blair and Bush. They will not abandon their friends. I believe them.

 

There was further good news delivered to the Coalition's camp as the week proceeded.

 

In a poll conducted by Oxford Research International, of 2500 Iraqis questioned, 56% said that conditions were better now than they had been before the war, and 70% of Iraqis said that things were going well or quite well in their lives. After only one year of reconstructing a broken and directionless country, these are promising results.

 

Not surprisingly, data like this will be selectively ignored by the usual suspects in the Western media. The last thing they want is some good news. They'd have to rewrite their template headlines.

 

The war on terrorism goes on, as it will continue to go on until Al—Qaeda is vanquished.

 

Last week was only a bitter reminder that the old enemy can rear its ugly head anywhere and at anytime. Justice will be delivered for the victims of Madrid — with or without — the Spanish by our side.

 

Recent events across the world may have inadvertently strengthened Blair's and Bush's hand. Whatever one may think of the Iraq War; any intellectually honest person has to admire the two leaders' staying power and strength of will. As some of the Western media are blathering about the Coalition's house falling down, Blair and Bush are relentlessly driving on with what they know is the essential objective: get Iraq back on its feet.

 

At first, it was natural to perceive events in Spain as harmful to the Coalition and the war on terror. While there can be no doubt that Spain's capitulation will increase the likelihood of another bomb attack in Europe, there are positive ramifications which arise from the sheep—like behavior of the Spaniards, and their new Prime Minister, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

 

Those Spanish voters, who under the influence of some form of group psychosis, stopped thinking clearly as they cast their votes, will one day look back in shame. It was almost as if —— suffering the anguish and shock of the terrorist attacks —— they could not step outside of that emotional environment, and see themselves and their moment of decision with objective clarity. They performed this act for us, on our television sets, on the radio and across the internet.

 

Of course, for the rest of us; the lesson learned could not be more poignant. The Spanish showed us exactly what not to do when Al—Qaeda surely comes knocking again. For that, at least, we can thank them.

 

Perhaps gratitude should also be showered on the accidental Zapatero. Give him a round of applause because his defeatist words and actions, have only increased the admiration many of us have for the leaders of the Coalition. The contrast in strength of character between Senor Zapatero and either Blair or Bush could not be sharper. They —— unlike him —— have some 'cojones', as the Spanish would say.

 

Another more positive outcome from Spain's defeat was that the Australians, Danes, Poles, and a few other Coalition members were so disgusted by Zapatero that they stepped up to the plate and categorically pledged to stand firm with  Blair and Bush. They will not abandon their friends. I believe them.

 

There was further good news delivered to the Coalition's camp as the week proceeded.

 

In a poll conducted by Oxford Research International, of 2500 Iraqis questioned, 56% said that conditions were better now than they had been before the war, and 70% of Iraqis said that things were going well or quite well in their lives. After only one year of reconstructing a broken and directionless country, these are promising results.

 

Not surprisingly, data like this will be selectively ignored by the usual suspects in the Western media. The last thing they want is some good news. They'd have to rewrite their template headlines.

 

The war on terrorism goes on, as it will continue to go on until Al—Qaeda is vanquished.

 

Last week was only a bitter reminder that the old enemy can rear its ugly head anywhere and at anytime. Justice will be delivered for the victims of Madrid — with or without — the Spanish by our side.